Archive for ‘Water Power’


06
JUN

Vince Adams says:
Letsgetenergized is making its return to champion Renewable Energy


Category: Climate Change, Community Energy, Dorset Energized News, Electric Transport, Energy Events in Dorset, Energy News for UK, Sustainable Energy Stories, Sustainable Farming & Food, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized, Water Power, Wildlife & Nature, Wind Power
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This prototype Electric Tram is being tested in China, it runs on white painted lines in the road. Its highly advanced batteries give it amazing serviceability and it carries over 300 people.

Everyday I’m sent examples of new ways of developing electric transport capabilities. From cars to aeroplanes the future is electric and combined with the enormous development of renewable energy we are entering a new fossil fuel free era.

We can dramatically reduce pollution which effects everyone of us going about our daily routine.

We can begin to reverse the worst forecasts of climate change and together make our Planet once again safe for the generations to come.

Join us in spreading the word that the UK should be taking a lead in developing renewable energy and of course majoring on moving from petrol/diesel powered transport to electric or eventually even hydrogen.

None of our political parties are focussing on renewable energy or climate change the most important issues of our times. Hold your potential MP’s locally to account and make commitments of support on both subjects.

Our commitment is clear, to the Planet, to landscape, to people and of course to the Natural World.

Tell us your own stories about installing solar, buying an electric car anything that will give confidence to other people thinking of making changes.

Forward our website details to all your friends, relatives and colleagues. Lets shout about this new energy and really get the show on the road here in the UK.https---blueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com-uploads-card-image-499014-01beaa53-bfe5-4474-adef-a6a4a3fc0533



10
JUL

Anna Celeste Watson says:
Explore renewable energy technologies for your home, business or farm


Category: Biomass Energy, Combined Heat & Power, Energy Efficiency, Heat Pumps, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy, Water Power, Wind Power
Tags:


Just wanted to share these great interactive diagrams created by MCS certified renewable energy installers Futurum Renewable Energy Systems who are based here in Dorset but cover much of the UK.

They are a really quick and easy visual way to explore what renewable energy options are possible for your home, business or farm – from Solar, Heat Pumps and Biomass Energy to Water and Wind Power.

futurum-home

futurum-business

futurum-farm

Click on the diagrams to link through to their site to see more, or to explore technologies further go to: http://futurumltd.co.uk/technologies.



08
APR

Conor MacGuire says:
Renewable Energy – Power Your Home More Effectively and Efficiently


Category: Biomass Energy, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy, Water Power, Wind Power
Tags:


In the recent years, the rising costs of energy have boosted the overall cost of living to all new heights. Thus, it now becomes necessary for the homeowners to set their sights on the alternative energy sources. These sources reduce both, energy dependence and expense to a significant amount.

As the fear of ending conventional sources of energy rises, the homemakers have started weighing other options for their energy consumption. More and more people now ought to invest in alternative energy resources of energy, and it seems to be a growing market. Along this, a number of states now offer rebates, tax credits, and other incentives to promote clean energy. So, now it’s your turn to switch to these energy sources, before it gets too late. Read out here to find some promising solutions, which can help power your home efficiently and effectively:

renewable-energy

Solar

When it comes to renewable sources, ‘Solar energy’ is the first to strike your brain. The reason for its ever increasing popularity is that it is the easiest solution, or better say, one of the most easily accessible. For your home, all you need is the photo-voltaic solar panels, batteries and an inverter.

The performance depends greatly on the region you are residing, for example, the location having sunny and brighter days for most of the time per year will show better results. But, that doesn’t mean the areas with less sunlight cannot use solar panels. Even, if the temperature falls off, the solar energy users can still keep their homes warm and bright.

Another advantage of solar energy is that it demands a little maintenance. The solar panels once installed, can provide large amounts of electricity and don’t ask for repairs often.

Wind

Do you know that wind energy is the second most widely used renewable source? But, many homemakers associate it with those mammoth wind farms, neglecting their usage at home. The fact which remains silent is that there are a number of small sized turbines available, perfect for producing a significant amount of energy.

So, it is a valuable solution for those looking for non- conventional sources. The speed of the wind in your region will decide over the right solution for your home. You can seek help from the weather services, they will let you know the average wind speed in your region.

Undoubtedly, bigger turbines are capable of generating a large amount of energy, but you can use a 10-kilowatt turbine for your home. It is 100 feet tall, the turbine is nearly 23 feet and is sufficient to produce enough energy for a house.

Micro Hydro Electricity

This is an effective solution and its installation is much easier. Warning!!! – It is ideal only if you live near moving water.

All you need is to place a pipe, running from the higher area (where water is flowing) to a lower piece of ground. As the water moves downhill, turns the turbine at the end of the pipe, energy is produced. Surprisingly, a number of micro hydro systems have been known to produce ten or even 100 times more power than wind or solar. Moreover, it is more efficient than the two other sources, as it can run non-stop and overnight.

Biomass

As far as the use of biomass for your home is considered, it usually includes the stove used to heat water or for general home heating. You can use plants, including wood waste, grass, crops or trees to fuel your stoves. It is sometimes reported to pollute the air, but it is still a green option as it produces less pollution than those fossil fuels, which involves burning of harsh chemicals.

So, there is a multitude of combinations available. Now, it depends on your budget to achieve energy independence with help of these renewable sources!

UK Gov is inspiring folks to use these technologies and providing loan under the scheme like Green Deal. If you need green deal in Scotland then contact Green Energy Scotland Limited for your needs. UK Gov is also running another scheme called: Renewable Heat Incentive Scheme. The Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) is the world’s first long-term financial support programme for renewable heat. The RHI pays participants of the scheme that generate and use renewable energy to heat their buildings.



19
JAN

Keith Wheaton-Green says:
100% renewable and self sufficient North Dorset in Electricity – here`s how


Category: Dorset Energized News, Green Electricity & Gas, Solar Energy, Uncategorized, Water Power, Wind Power
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100% renewable and self sufficient North Dorset in Electricity – here`s how

The most recent statistics from the Department of Energy and Climate Change show that North Dorset consumes 290.8 GWh/yr

The last census shows 30,397 households, only 11% of those being flats. Quite a few of these dwellings already have PV installed on their roofs but that number is likely to increase substantially when PV becomes so cheap that it will make better financial sense to install it than pay for all your electricity from the grid. This grid parity (without subsidy) is expected to come about as early as 2020. More than half of houses have close to south facing roof space and it’s reasonable to assume that 60% or so could accommodate a 4 kW array. These would generate around 65 GWh/yr

There are 3,800 businesses in North Dorset including farms. Not all will have their own roof space but all those steel sheds on industrial estates and agricultural barns have low pitched roofs that are viable for PV whatever their orientation. A quick look at Google Earth shows at least 50 big enough to take around 50 kW in the towns and farm barns would probably double that. So I estimate these could generate 5 GWh/yr.

There are already quite a few large and small ground mounted solar farms installed and enough space to generate the equivalent of the districts needs without impacting food production. A reasonably large solar farm is 10 MW generating 10 GWh/yr so 29 of those would equate to the district’s annual consumption.

There are at least 6 small 20 kW wind turbines (up to 20 m mast and 7 m blades) in North Dorset tucked away virtually un-noticed. The landscape could easily accommodate 50 small turbines without travellers and walkers constantly coming across them. They could generate 0.35 GWh/yr.

The River Stour and its tributaries already has 4 hydro turbines installed at mills and weirs with another 5 to be installed soon and potential for at least 6. They range from 3.7 to 89 kW and in total could generate 1.75 GWh/yr.

Now the elephant in the room, which is big wind power They may be very much out of favour with a vocal minority punching well above their weight but the fact is that a 2.3MW on-shore wind turbine is the cheapest source of renewable electricity. It would require 60 of these to generate the equivalent of all the district’s electricity and that could not be accommodated easily. I would say a maximum of 20 could be found a home and 10 would be more realistic and they could generate 48.5 GWh/yr

So North Dorset could generate equivalent to all its electrical need with;

65 GWh/yr from domestic roof tops

5 GWh/yr from commercial and agricultural roof tops

0.35 GWh/yr from small wind turbines

1.75 GWh/yr from hydropower

That leaves 218.7 GWh/yr to be found from a combination of large solar farms and wind turbines. Personally, I would like to see 10 large wind turbines, some of those to be clearly viewed from my back garden. That would mean 17 x 10 MW solar farms to take up the slack.


1Comments | Post your own comment

  • vince adams comments:
    "Keith gives a cogent and totally understandable summary of how North Dorset with just a number of small steps could create 100% of its energy needs renewably.
    Think what if every district, County did a similar exercise how simple going renewable could be and how we could see the end of coal, gas and nuclear power for ever.
    This is now not in the realms of fairy stories its hard economic sense and will support reductions in climate change temps and give us better air quality all at the sametime. "

    January 19, 2015 a 6:42 pm


10
SEP

Lets Get Energized says:
Pymore, Bridport – Community Hydro Power Event


Category: Community Energy, Energy Events in Dorset, Water Power
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Pymore, Bridport – Community Hydro Power Event

Three weeks ago we described (here) how members of Dorset Energized had been invited to investigate the possibility of installing a small Hydro Power electricity generating station on the river Brit in Pymore near Bridport.

Well things are moving along and to build momentum on the 22nd September at 7.00 pm a Tea & Cakes event is being held at the Weir itself, in Pymore, where you can find out more about what is being proposed. It will also be an opportunity to pledge money toward the development, an investment in a better, greener, cleaner, future.

So if you have the slightest interest in hydro power, community energy, or are just curious, please come along and meet the people involved – a mixture of local residents and people with experience of developing community energy projects.

Would you like your community to generate its own electricity from the river

Would you like your community to generate its own electricity from the river?


3Comments | Post your own comment

  • Keith Wheaton-Green comments:
    "Thanks for your questions Monty. If the management committee agree use of the river bank for a meeting next Monday, I hope you can join us and would appreciate it if you can ask further questions that I will answer as best I can. I want to emphasize that in my view, this has to be a community project and should not proceed further unless there is a clear will from the management company and residents to do so.
    The drawing is representational only and the turbine house has to fit in with the visual aesthetic of the site. It would need to be placed above flood level, as would the generator.An abstraction license, flood risk consent and possibly impoundment license would be required from the Environment Agency. The project design and negotiations with the EA would be lengthy. The site owner (the management company?) has right of access and must give their permission. A resident of Pymore (Jonny) has publicised the Monday meeting to all in Pymore and Management company directors will – I presume – carry above average weight at the event. The power could go three ways from the 3 phase generator to three different properties where the grid connections would be made. There are numerous design choices. I believe the project should be community owned. Again, there are choices as to the structure.`There are lots of discussions that could be had. I believe Vince and I have the answers to most questions that can be thrown at us but we want to hear the views of the company and residents. "

    September 15, 2014 a 11:13 am

  • vince adams comments:
    "Dear Monty, thanks for your comments which are really what we are exploring on Monday. We want to hear from everyone locally about their feelings, is it good idea , should we go forward together and explore all the problems. requirements and possibilities. I am sure Keith will be able to answer many of the technical questions and I am there to talk about community share schemes. But its your project and local desires that count. "
    September 15, 2014 a 9:54 am

  • Monty Crook comments:
    "Interesting and fine in theory. No account seems to have been taken of what happens to a wooden top structure that it subject to major flooding at that point maybe 2-3 times a yeard. Also, what permissions are needed and from whom. Who ‘owns’ the existing structures in the river at that point? The Environment Agency? Have they given any permission? What access rights would be needed and from whom? Has Pymore Villoage Management Company been approached? Where would the power produced ‘go’? Where would it be connected to the grid – on whose property? Who would own/manage the installation – and administer the finances? What track record do they have? Monty Crook, Pymore "
    September 14, 2014 a 10:47 am


20
AUG

Keith Wheaton-Green says:
Now You See it Now You Don`t, Govt Support – Again


Category: Community Energy, Renewable Energy, Uncategorized, Water Power
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Now You See it Now You Don`t, Govt Support – Again

The rate of feed in tariff for each technology is reviewed every 3 months and if more than a certain designated megawattage is installed then that triggers a drop in the tariff.

This has just happened for hydropower, wind and AD. PV remains untouched this round. See http://www.british-hydro.org/news/decc_confirm_10_degression_for.html and follow the link.

For a hydro scheme you can pre accredit with Ofgem to fix you tariff rate at the current level if you have the required Environment Agency EA licenses but have not yet installed. Hydro schemes take years to develop due to the complexity of EA license requirements and a long time to install because of the bespoke nature of each project (no off-the-shelf-solutions as with solar and wind. So there is a large proportion of pre=accredited but unbuilt hydro schemes that have triggered this degression. Worse still, we are expecting another 10% degression in July 2015. When you add to this the recent rise from £135 to £1500 for EA licensing you can see that hydro is fast becoming unviable.

We develop these renewable projects because we know they are needed to mitigate climate change and we are environmentalists. But this government has constantly changed the goal posts and keeps the industry destabilised and performing well below its potential. Ed Davey has done the best he can at DECC and was until recently ably supported by Greg Barker (who fellow Conservatives accused of “going native” within DECC ie agreeing with Ed Davey’s line). But he has been partially undermined by George Osborne who has fossil fuel leanings and probably doesn’t want to see those interests undermined by a renewable industry that is too successful.

I would say from recent RE generation stats, you can see that with stable support and let off the leash, RE could kill off the fossil fuel industry quite quickly.



14
AUG

Keith Wheaton-Green says:
There really is a Renewable Energy Revolution Going On!


Category: Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Water Power, Wind Power
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There really is a Renewable Energy Revolution Going On!

I’ve just read about the record breaking wind energy records for a day in August 2014. 5.0 GW of electricity supplying 17% of the UK demand on a Sunday night. At the same time hydro was delivering 2.0% and biomass 2.5%. So we had 21.0% of electricity being delivered by renewable`s.

However, it appears that these figures from the trade organisation Renewables UK and other data from DECC don’t include anything other than the half hourly metered generation ie the big MegaWatt sized wind and solar farms, big Scottish high head hydro plant and old coal fired power stations converted to burn wood pellet or chip. What about all the Solar PhotoVoltaics on house and industrial estate roofs or the small 20 kW wind turbines on farms or the small hydro plant at old mill sites? These don’t appear to be captured in the data because up to the minute (well half hour) generation data is not available. They are only metered on a quarterly basis. Luckily you can get an idea of what is happening with these small kW sized installations from the ofgem Feed In Tariff`s statistical reports – Click Here and go to FIT installations statistical report – or direct to the report: Here

My calculations indicate an additional 1% of UK demand over the course of a year. Less than I was hoping for but growing quickly all the time. Especially Solar PV, which is apparently found on 1 in every 32 houses in the south west. I know from my own generation from 4 kW of PV and the generation from the South Somerset District Council PV portfolio that 2014 has been a bumper year.


1Comments | Post your own comment


03
SEP

Anna Celeste Watson says:
Save water & energy this World Water Week 2013 (1-6 September)


Category: Energy Efficiency, Sustainable Living, Water Power
Tags: ,


This week is World Water Week (from 1st to 6th September 2013) so a rather apt opportunity for us all to think about the way we use and overuse water!

According to the humanitarian charity Water Aid there is a global water crisis, as every minute, every day, people in poorer countries suffer and lives are lost needlessly, simply because of a lack of safe water and sanitation.

In stark contrast here in the UK, the vast amount of water we all use every day at home alone is simply putting an unsustainable demand on our planet’s resources, biodiversity and people, so we need to save water and recycle it where we can.

Did you know?…
The average person in the UK uses 150 litres of water a day!

World Water Week is hosted and organised by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) and takes place each year in Stockholm. The World Water Week has been the annual focal point for the globe’s water issues since 1991. Every year, over 200 collaborating organisations convene events at the World Water Week. In addition, individuals from around the globe present their findings at the scientific workshops.

The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is one of their supporters and has lots of information on their website on how you can save water and on their campaign to reduce the impact of humanity’s water footprint.

There are lots of small things you can do every day to reduce your water usage that can make a huge difference for our planet – from something as simple as turning the tap off while you brush your teeth, to installing a Hippo in your cistern… Check out Waterwise’s Quick Tips and Facts on Saving Water.

Did you know?…
It takes 10,000 – 20,000 litres of water to produce just 1kg of beef! This compares with around 1,200 litres for 1kg of maize and 1800 for a kilo of wheat. See more on the RAW website.

Did you also know?…
Hydro-electric power, which comes from using water to turn a turbine, supplies around 20% of the world’s electricity and yet it is barely being used at all in the UK even though we have one of the highest wave energy potentials in Europe, if not the world!

For information on how we can use water as a renewable energy source to make hydro-electricity, here in Dorset and the UK, see our section all about Water Power.

You can also check out our Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Living pages for top tips on saving water to save energy (and maybe save on your water bills too!)


2Comments | Post your own comment

  • Anna Celeste Watson comments:
    "Thanks for your comment Len – very good point and great to see Frack Free Dorset has a new website, good luck with all your campaigning. "
    September 3, 2013 a 2:25 pm

  • Len Herbert comments:
    "The perfect week to remind ourselves about hydraulic fracturing for shale gas. Fracking uses between 3 and 8 million gallons of water per frack, the water is so toxic with chemicals and radioactive particles it cannot be recycled and when the well leaks as all wells do eventually the water table will also be contaminated.
    Find out more at http://frackfreedorset.org.uk "

    September 3, 2013 a 2:20 pm


28
AUG

Simon Jonathan Naish Rayson says:
Could Weymouth have its own Tidal Mill… Again…?


Category: Community Energy, Water Power
Tags:


Tidal mills were once a fairly common feature in medieval Europe. They were deemed a reliable source of energy. Even in relatively modern times a few lingered on. But now of course they are regarded as interesting historical curiosities if they are noticed at all.

Tidal mills have inspired the idea of building modern electricity generating plants using the same basic principles (allowing the tide to flow in, but capturing the water and then releasing it later to drive a wheel/turbine). But so far there are very few examples of electricity being generated this way (there’s one on the Rance estuary in France which cleverly uses the incoming tide as well as the outgoing).

No UK Tidal Mills… yet!
In the UK so far there are none. The Severn Estuary has been proposed as a site for an enormous tidal mill – but probably due to it being so enormous many obstacles stand in the way, so it never gets beyond the drawing board. But, if we could build these tidal mills in the middle ages, why can’t we now?

Check out these links below for some historical examples and interesting UK museums:

The Tide Mill Living Museum in Suffolk – www.woodbridgetidemill.org.uk
Welsh Mills Society – www.welshmills.org.uk/carew.m0.html
The House Mill London – www.housemill.org.uk (you can support them to reinstate the machinery to working order and develop education and hydroelectricity at the site – the deadline is this September 2013)

Perhaps the problem is this determination that unless it’s a large system it’s not worth bothering with? Maybe (one day) it might seem worthwhile to build small Tidal Mills/Power Stations? And perhaps being smaller they will be seen to be practical and then we might have (found) another source of renewable (and reliable) energy to contribute to the overall supply.

And that it seems to me, could be rather beautiful (the historical ones have a sort of practical beauty after all).

Weymouth Historic Tidal Mill
It is possible that there was once a Tide Mill in Weymouth – see more on https://sites.google.com/site/dorsetwindmills/weymouth-tidal-mill – and it does seem clear that the tidal race in Weymouth Harbour is of sufficient strength to show such a mill would have been viable, as of course an electricity generating mill/turbine would also.

Water Power on a Smaller Scale in Dorset & Beyond

There are Community Energy projects going on throughout the UK including by the Stour and Vale Hydro Group in Dorset to reinstate old water mills. Check out the Bindon Mill Screw Turbine Installation – a local project which turned a disused water mill into a hydropowered renewable electricity generator. Perhaps you could help regenerate an old watermill near you, to power your community?!

Find out more about how Water Power can generate renewable electricity at: www.letsgetenergized.co.uk/energy/water-power


1Comments | Post your own comment

  • Anna Celeste Watson comments:
    "Just came across news in The Guardian that Scotland has given the green light to Europe’s largest tidal energy project where wave power will provide electricity to 40% homes in the Highlands as work on building turbines in Pentland Firth gets approved – let’s hope Dorset will follow their example! : ) http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/sep/16/scotland-tidal-energy-project "
    September 17, 2013 a 1:21 pm


04
MAR

Lets Get Energized says:
Climate Week in Your Community


Category: Climate Change, Community Energy, Renewable Energy, Water Power
Tags:


Climate Week is a supercharged national occasion that offers an annual renewal of the ambition and confidence to combat climate change.

It is for everyone wanting to do their bit to protect our planet and create a secure future. It aims to shine a spotlight on the many positive steps already being taken in workplaces and communities across Britain. The power of these real, practical examples – the small improvements and the big innovations – will then inspire millions more people.

We’re very excited to see that here in Dorset there are 6 private events and 3 public events planned to celebrate Climate Week.
To find a local event go to the Climate Week website and search your area: www.climateweek.com/find-an-event.

As well as the small steps you can take personally and in your home or business to save energy – see our section on your Renewable Energy Options for starters – you may also want to consider getting involved in a Community Energy Project. For inspiration check out the Bindon Mill Screw Turbine Installation – a local project which turned a disused water mill into a hydropowered renewable electricity generator –  perhaps you could help regenerate an old watermill near you, to power your community?! If you have any more ideas for Dorset community energy projects please do let us know!



02
OCT

Wendy Pillar says:
90% of North Dorset want to generate renewable energy


Category: Community Energy, Dorset Energized News, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy, Water Power, Wind Power
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Energize Stur Valley recently carried out a survey of North Dorset residents on their views on renewable energy. Enthusiasts on the subject that we are, even we were surprised at just how positive they all are about renewable energy.

Some 90% of people questioned felt positive towards renewable energy projects, and 90% also felt that Dorset should generate more if its own electricity, since it currently generates a tiny 0.0001% of the electricity that it uses.

The most popular idea for generating renewable energy was photovoltaic panels on industrial and agricultural buildings, with 93% of those questioned in favour. These are frequently very suitable for PV owing to their large roof areas that are not overshadowed, as long as they face south.

Also extremely popular was the idea of putting PV panels on the roofs of public buildings, such as schools, with 90% in favour. Again, these buildings tend to have large, accessible roof areas. PV panels at ground level were far less popular, with only 52% in favour, it being often remarked that it is better to grow food in fields where possible.

The latest large wind turbines are by far the most efficient way to generate electricity in our climate. However, they do have a significant impact on the landscape, and not everyone considers them things of beauty. This was reflected in the survey, with 48% in favour of the large wind turbines and 59% in favour of the smaller 20-metre-high models.

Both hydropower and anaerobic digesters were highly popular, both with 86% in favour. Anaerobic digesters can be a good option on farms producing animal waste, such as indoor poultry and pig units. They can also use collected food waste from catering outlets and food processing businesses.

Finally, 65% of those questioned thought that it was a good idea to set up community investment funds, whereby local people can invest in local renewable energy projects with a relatively small investment, thereby keeping the income generated within the community. We have taken this on board, and are looking into how this can be done.

The survey gave a fascinating insight into what North Dorset people really think about renewable energy, and we plan to repeat it in the future to see how views change as renewable energy projects come into production. Watch this space!

There is still just about time to get new PV projects installed before the Feed in Tariff goes down in October 2012 – find out more on our webpage: http://www.letsgetenergized.co.uk/energy/solar-energy


3Comments | Post your own comment

  • Caz comments:
    "Dont think the locals would complain if you put quiet, low PV panels in the Milborne area.
    What I want to know is if this is a survey of North Dorset residents where and how was it carried out because as a North Dorset resident no one has asked me to fill out a survey? And how many surveys were returned as unless you had a return rate of 75% of North Dorset residents it’s not a true reflection of the area! This site needs to clarify the data it uses! Otherwise its just a sales pitch. May be trading standards should look in to it! "

    October 13, 2012 a 11:19 am

  • Richard Howman comments:
    "Regarding the “Survey” of North Dorset Residents to which Ms Pillar refers, can she, in the interests of transparency, please advise:- a. The total sample size
    b. The sampling methodology (Nb ‘Internet’ is not a valid sampling technique)
    c. The sample demographic Thank you
    Richard Howman "

    October 12, 2012 a 6:39 pm

  • HJL comments:
    "There is no doubt that sources of renewable energy should be a primary consideration for all. But lessons should be learned about the impact of wind turbine sites from those areas with insight and knowledge. A review of the literature (and Court settlements) reveals that dwellings DO suffer noise disturbance (planning councils in Scotland are advised not to grant planning permission within 2 km of residential dwellings), ‘flicker’ causes distraction to drivers on nearby roads and tourism is detrimentally affected. These three issues convince me that the proposed Milborne Wind Farm (sited close to dwellings, adjacent to A35 and in an area where many residents run B&B businesses) must be strongly opposed. "
    October 2, 2012 a 9:05 pm


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