Archive for ‘Renewable Energy’


16
FEB

Vince Adams says:
Co-Founder of Green and Black hits out…..


Category: Renewable Energy, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized
Tags: , ,


We sent Craig Sams the co-founder of Green and Black an article about how difficult the Government had made the development of renewable energy to continue its development right now.

He came back with the following comment:

“One thing is the EU’s 74.5% tariff on imports of solar glass from China. This props up some European manufacturers but it also makes the cost of solar installations less competitive. Fossil fuels are still heavily subsidised while subsidies for solar are slashed and solar glass is heavily taxed. The Chinese lead the world in wind and solar – they have no big oil companies and want to get rid of coal.”

This dispels the myth that renewables are costing consumers a lot on their energy bills. Compared with the support overtime for fossil fuels and nuclear its extremely modest.

Take another look at our website that aim to give you the real facts about renewables and get involved in the debate now, its our real future for energy and the Planet.



03
FEB

Vince Adams says:
Help Hydro Projects to survive


Category: Dorset Energized News, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Energy Stories, Uncategorized, Water Power
Tags:


The Hydro movement needs our help !! Read on :

From: Simon Hamlyn [mailto:Simon.Hamlyn@british-hydro.org]
Sent: 01 February 2016 12:15
To: Simon Hamlyn
Subject: Petition to the House of Lords
m
Dear Member,

As you well know, the hydropower sector has been hit hard by the recent maelstrom of Government policy changes and we now face a very challenging future. Intentional or non, the effects are real and we whilst we have been lobbying both DECC and the Treasury very hard and continue to do so, we have also been working with many MP’s and Peers in England and Scotland over the past 6 months. Amongst others, we have requested meetings with the Secretary of State, Amber Rudd and with the leader of the Conservatives in Scotland, Ruth Davidson.

In particular we have been supporting Baroness Featherstone in her work in the Lords to get the Government to rescind the tariff cuts through her ‘Regret motion’ which she has tabled. Her address to the Lords is Tuesday 2nd February and by bringing our numbers we can add weight to her plea – ‘Feed-in Tariffs (Amendment) (No. 3) Order 2015 Baroness Featherstone to move that a Humble Address be presented to Her Majesty praying that the Order, laid before the House on 18 December 2015, be annulled (SI 2015/2045). 20th Report from the Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee’

The BHA has also teamed up with one of our members, the Micro hydropower Association and their CEO Kate Gilmartin, so please add your name to the attached letter by signing our petition at the link http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld/ldordpap.htm

Please pass on to all those within your network and get them to sign as soon as possible.

Let me know if you have any questions

Simon

Simon Hamlyn BA Hons
Chief Executive Officer
British Hydropower Association
Mobile: +44 (0)7788 278422
Home office: +44 (0)1978 780910
Unit 6B Manor Farm Business Centre
Gussage St Michaelp
Dorset
BH21 5HT



31
JAN

Vince Adams says:
Is this the final nail in the coffin for Wind Energy in Dorset


Category: Dorset Energized News, Renewable Energy, Uncategorized, Wind Power
Tags: ,


Last week opponents of Wind Energy won yet another victory in stopping the Slyers Lane proposal.
This was indeed a sad day for Dorset whose target for clean energy is now in tatters.
This horrendous not in my backyard approach of a minority of Dorset’s people will no doubt comeback to haunt them one day soon when Fracking becomes the goto alternative for our County.
If anyone thinks that WT’s are a threat compared with the ravages of Fracking then they are nuts.
So to the next generation I say sorry, sorry we could not win the argument for you.
Remember its our Country and when its your time to vote next think about how the current Government have decimated the renewable energy industry.
Come forward Mr Corbin and The Green Party we want and need alternative thinking !!



21
JAN

Vince Adams says:
Keith Wheaton Green speaks out


Category: Renewable Energy, Uncategorized
Tags: ,


Power from the People
I was at a meeting of the South Somerset Hydropower Group (SSHG) a couple of weeks ago. Have you noticed how whenever a group of British people meet on more than one occasion to discuss matters of mutual interest, they instinctively elect a chairman, secretary, treasurer and thereafter, manage their affairs with integrity? Their interests usually also have some benefit to wider society. This has certainly been true of SSHG. The group have had a profoundly positive effect on developing the hydropower industry in the SW. Members attend consultation events organised by the Environment Agency and government departments as well as opening their sites for visits. Apparently 39% of the UK population volunteer at least once a year. People give their time and energy to achieve things for society as a whole. Very civilised. David Cameron described it as the “Big Society” and gave much encouragement including “The Building a Stronger Civil Society Strategy” published in 2010.
There followed in 2014 a “Community Energy Strategy” which set out a vision for rapid expansion of the community owned energy sector and an explanation of the financial incentives from government.
Many of us interested renewable energy responded by setting up a community energy society to develop installations owned and managed by people living nearby. There are now over 5,000 of these who have developed PV, wind and hydro projects in the UK with the south west well represented. A lot of voluntary work went into finding sites, negotiating with site owners and renewable energy installers, writing share offer documents and sorting out land and roof leases. Volunteers organisations cannot be as fleet of foot as in the commercial world. In most cases the volunteers are on a steep learning curve. But the future for this activity was bright. The government had told us so.
However, during the latter half of 2015 – without the Lib Dems pushing this agenda from the Department of Energy and Climate Change – we have seen a dramatic change of emphasis. First we had the consultation to reduce the feed in tariffs (FITs) by 87%. We don’t know for sure whether government will take any notice of the 55,000 responses, which include what DECC describe as “2800 detailed written responses,” but they don’t usually make a difference. Secondly, the ability to pre-accredit a project – so that it has a FIT rate guaranteed two years before installation – has been removed. This is particularly cruel for hydro projects because it can take years to get the necessary licenses and permissions, and money spent achieving them is even more at risk when the returns are unknown. Thirdly, George Osborne announced that – despite the promises in the Community Energy Strategy – Social Investment Tax Relief would specifically not be available for Community Energy Societies.
The net result of these changes is that the projects that have soaked up so much volunteer time, energy and enthusiasm, that cannot be installed before the multiple deadlines do not stack up financially. It seems our efforts may have been wasted. So much for Cameron’s “Big Society
Government U turns are also having an impact on the South West’s renewable energy installation companies. The Renewable Energy Association estimates 20.000 jobs will be lost so I was interested to listen to the CEO of a small SW company. They had diversified from their long established plumbing and heating company to install PV, solar thermal, biomass boilers and heat pumps. In the year ending June 2015 their turnover of renewable energy business was £600k which amounted to 2/3 of their business. New premises had been taken on and staff diverted from traditional boiler work. Money was spent in training. Since the proposed FITs cuts were announced there has been a large amount of work booked for installation before January 2016 to take advantage of the current tariffs. There have been no enquiries for work after then so they will have to lay off one member of staff. The company will revert to its original core business and hope to take work from other competing business. Basically, renewables were an area of growth enabling existing businesses to expand and new ones to set up. We will now see a contraction and redundancies.
Individual Conservative MPs have been supportive of their constituents pro renewables dialogue. However, I suspect many currently working in the renewables industry regret the loss of Lib Dem MPs in the SW that lead to the demise of the Coalition government.

 

“this article first appeared in The Landsman”



13
JAN

Vince Adams says:
Time to get off the fence


Category: Renewable Energy, Uncategorized, Wind Power
Tags: ,


The future of our Planet and what our kids will inherit is now of crucial importance. Renewable Energy is clearly the key energy solution going forward and Wind specifically on-shore wind energy is the most productive source.

It harms almost no-one, it even has aesthetic beauty and it delivers energy directly to the people who need it.

So its time to ask your MP’s, Local Councillors etc why they don’t give it their 100% backing and to help you support this campaign the Pro Wind Group have produced the following letter.

Its extremely well crafted and if you agree with its points I urge you to print it and send it as soon as possible to your local representatives.

Its time that the majority had their say !!

Thankyou for subscribing to LGE.com

 

Open Letter to WDDC Councillors about Renewable Energy in Dorset

17th May 2015

Dear

Congratulations on your recent election to West Dorset District Council.

You and the other newly constituted local councils around the country are now in the hugely responsible position of facing a wide range of decisions that can make or break national aspirations for climate change mitigation.
The United Nations Development Programme estimates that over 70% of climate reduction measures are undertaken by local government.

Climate change is the issue of our times. Indecisiveness now will result in huge costs later.
The UK Committee on Climate Change states in its progress report for 2014 that ‘urgent and intensive action before 2020’ would save £100 billion, reduce reliance on imported fossil fuels from politically unstable countries and have a positive impact on energy prices.

Economic Benefits of Renewable Energy to Dorset 

There is considerable merit in embracing the move to renewable energy purely on economic grounds.
According to Regen SW there are already 10,000 jobs in the renewable sector in the SW and this is expected to rise to 34,000 by 2020.

Currently about £30 million enters the local economy in the form of feed-in tariffs earned by households and there is potential for more.
There are increasing opportunities for people to invest in solar panels on their local school or village hall through organisations such as Dorset Community Energy, a not-for-profit community benefit society.
Standard practice for wind farms is to offer an annual community benefit of £5,000 per MW and solar farms £1000 per MW for the lifetime of the project. Existing solar farms across 11 Dorset parishes have already agreed a community benefit spend of £2 million.

Opponents tend to exaggerate the level of subsidy. Government figures calculate the total subsidy for UK renewable energy to be £38 per household per annum. The costs of the established technologies of solar and wind are dropping even faster than expected and it is highly likely that by 2020 they will be cheaper than other forms of energy and will need no subsidy.

The move to renewables in the UK will come. The only question is whether Dorset politicians will assist Dorset in benefiting fully from its huge natural resources of sun and wind.

Making Progress towards Renewable Energy in Dorset

There are already some great success stories in Dorset:

  • The Piddle Valley community of 2500 homes is supplied with 100% renewable energy from solar and biogas
  • The largest solar farm in the UK is the 60MW farm near Bournemouth airport that is so well screened that most people are unaware of its existence.
  • Corbin Industries in Bridport employs 70 people to make frames for solar panels.

However there is still a mountain to climb during your tenure as councillor.

Much of the low-hanging fruit has been picked and the challenge is becoming clearer.

The Bournemouth, Dorset and Poole Renewable Energy (BDPRE) Strategy sets a 7.5% target for renewable energy generation for 2020. The strategy has been produced by the Dorset Energy Partnership that includes Dorset County Council, all the district and borough councils and a wide range of community groups. The latest figures (March 2015) indicate that 3.4% of total energy consumption can be covered by projects that have been built or are in construction.

So we still need to double the capacity in the next 5 years. This really is a minimum since further national targets beyond 2020 are increasingly ambitious.

The Dorset Energy Partnership, which includes WDDC, has clearly rejected widely circulated claims by some groups that targets have almost been reached.

/continued…

Protecting Landscape, Wildlife and Heritage Assets

Last month no lesser person than the director general of the National Trust, Dame Helen Ghosh, made an unequivocal statement that climate change poses ‘the biggest threat’ to the land and houses in the care of the National Trust. She cited loss of biodiversity and wildlife on the land and the already substantially increased flood, stormwater, subsidence and gale damage to properties. She promised that the trust would lead by example in moving to renewable energy generation.

The Government’s ‘UK 2012 Climate Change Risk Assessment’ examines threats to the built environment and concludes that the risks posed by sea level rise and higher average temperatures will have a substantial impact by mid-century and that extreme weather events resulting from climate change are already causing substantial damage.

It is important to protect our landscape, wildlife and heritage assets for the current generation, but the only way to secure their long-term future is to tackle climate change.

Local Government Decisions

You are the tier of government best placed to show leadership and to bring businesses and communities along with you. You are in a position to turn good ideas into tangible results – cooperatives for local energy production are a good example.

You will face planning decisions that must be guided by key statements in the NPPF (National Planning Policy Framework) – ‘all communities should play their part in contributing to renewable energy generation’ and ‘local government should design policies to maximise renewable energy’.
The BDPRE Strategy is clear that to achieve the 2020 target the full range of renewable technologies will need to be exploited in the form of both small and large scale projects. In particular there will have to be some larger scale, appropriately sited, solar and wind farms in the mix.
Developers are aware that the number of suitable sites in Dorset is very limited, in particular because of the extent of the designated AONBs (Areas of outstanding Natural Beauty) and other environmental designations. Most developers consider site selection carefully before committing large sums of money to a project.

Councillors need to be clear that if they reject the projects coming into planning in the immediate future they are prepared to accept that Dorset will not reach its target. Dorset people will be refused the opportunity to play their fair part in the national endeavour to decarbonise electricity.

The next 5 years offer an exciting opportunity for councillors to make a real difference to our social, environmental and economic future by ensuring that initiatives and planning decisions are firmly focused on the achievement by 2020 of the targets we have set ourselves in Dorset for all the reasons we have outlined above.

The following groups are signatories to this letter:

Transition Town Dorchester

Dorset Community Action

Dorchester Churches Together (Ecology Group)

West Dorset Friends of the Earth

Dorset Energised

Charminster Clean Energy Group

Dorchester Quaker Meeting

West Dorset Pro Wind

Bridport Renewable Energy Group

Weymouth Environmental Action Centre

Transition Town Bridport



19
DEC

Vince Adams says:
Regen’s upbeat message


Category: Renewable Energy, Uncategorized
Tags:


Who said renewable energy has been dealt a lethal blow by our Government ? Regen SW are extremely upbeat.

“Cognitive Dissonance: the state of having inconsistent thoughts, beliefs, or attitudes, especially as relating to behavioural decisions and attitude change”

  • “Let’s just imagine for a moment what we would have to say to our grandchildren if we failed. We would have to say, it was all too difficult,”  David Cameron, Paris ‘COP 21’ Climate Summit, 30th November 2015.
  • “New measures to deal with the projected over-allocation of renewable energy subsidies have been announced today” DECC announcement, 17 December 2015.

 

t many ways 2015 has been a spectacular year for clean energy with 60 GW of wind and 55 GW of solar deployed globally and global commitments to clean energy culminating in the Paris agreement. In the UK renewables topped 25 per cent of electricity generation for two quarters in a row. Perhaps it is this very success and the threat to incumbent business models it represents, that has led to the policy backlash in the UK over the last six months.

We at Regen have been inspired by the resilience and innovation in the sector – so strikingly on display at our Renewable Futures: Pathways to Parity conference. Working with our sector to develop new business models will be our key focus in the year ahead.

Our first event of 2016 will be our reception at the House of Commons on 13th January with Amber Rudd, on our Entreprenurial Women in Renewable Energy initiative.

For lots more detail and info contact: Regen SW rhayes@regensw.co.uk



13
JUL

Keith Wheaton-Green says:
Wind Turbines in Dorset? Planning Committee says NO


Category: Community Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Uncategorized, Wind Power
Tags: , , ,


Wind Turbines in Dorset? Planning Committee says NO

kwgwtkwg1

I recently attended a wind turbine planning determination in a crowded village hall when the planning committee (well 6 of the 11 members attended) decided the fate of an application for 4 large wind turbines. We all listened to officers of the council and AONB explain the landscape and heritage sensitivities (the turbines would be seen in the setting of listed buildings and the beautiful Dorset landscape) followed by numerous speakers against and for the application.

Those opposed to the application made the point that our landscape must be preserved, that the turbines would be seen from village houses and gardens and even that wind turbines damage people’s health. The CPRE claimed that renewable energy targets in Dorset had been exceeded so no new installations were needed. Each speaker received rapturous applause.

I have witnessed a few campaigns to oppose wind turbine applications in Somerset and Dorset. There is usually assistance from outside organisations. Meetings, leaflets and doorstep petitions are arranged. The purpose – of course – is to raise anxiety levels. Misinformation is spread such as; bird and bat populations are put at risk; infra sound prevents people sleeping and gives them headaches; house prices will fall and tourists will stay away. Wind turbines are inefficient and generate hardly anything. Sometimes photographs that exaggerate the scale are published.

In reality, the choice to approve or not – as the officers and members present acknowledged –is justified on the basis of a subjective view of landscape and visual aesthetics.

About seven of us spoke up in favour of the application. It was explained that climate change is an issue that needs to be dealt with so urgently we need to move to 100% of our electricity from renewables ASAP, that wind turbines are the cheapest technology but that there are very sites suitable for their installation in Dorset.

When I spoke, looking out onto the big audience of grey haired baby boomers while younger people were at work, I realised just where the divide in opinion lay. The majority of the audience – many retired to timeless Hardy’s Dorset – would not sacrifice their views from around the village to give the younger generation a better future. Yet just think what the generation before the baby boomers sacrificed in the 30s, 40s and 50s!

Anyone wanting to live in Hardy’s Dorset should stop using electricity, swap their car for a horse and cart, live in a very small draughty house and campaign to take out pylons and large roads. If we walk backwards into the future, we will suffer because we can’t see where we are going.

I spoke up for farmers. They may be sitting on land and property worth millions with large sums flowing through their business but their disposable income can be modest. They work very long hours as standard and consider themselves guardians of the land (and landscape) which they expect to pass on to their children rather than realize paper wealth.

I was once told by a farmer – only half-jokingly – that I shouldn’t expect him to take my opinions on local matters seriously because my family had not been in Dorset since Saxon times. Despite that comment, farmers are usually quiet, self-effacing, not prone to voicing their opinions and actually can be intimidated.

Wind turbines make sense to farmers because they give resource efficient future financial security. The opposing camp are very ably led by people some of which, have moved into the area to retire. They put high value on the landscape the farming community have created and look after, but look to the past rather than the constant change and planning for the future they may have experienced in their own working lives.

The media are underestimating the connection between peoples voting intentions and their views on climate change. The Green surge is largely due to younger people with a strong sense of injustice against their generation. Baby boomers have had it good with their jetting around the world on holiday, big cars and houses by mortgaging their children’s and grandchildren’s futures (the deficit.) This put the carbon in the atmosphere that puts future generations in jeopardy.



10
JUL

Anna Celeste Watson says:
Explore renewable energy technologies for your home, business or farm


Category: Biomass Energy, Combined Heat & Power, Energy Efficiency, Heat Pumps, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy, Water Power, Wind Power
Tags:


Just wanted to share these great interactive diagrams created by MCS certified renewable energy installers Futurum Renewable Energy Systems who are based here in Dorset but cover much of the UK.

They are a really quick and easy visual way to explore what renewable energy options are possible for your home, business or farm – from Solar, Heat Pumps and Biomass Energy to Water and Wind Power.

futurum-home

futurum-business

futurum-farm

Click on the diagrams to link through to their site to see more, or to explore technologies further go to: http://futurumltd.co.uk/technologies.



02
JUN

Lets Get Energized says:
Proposed solar development at Mapperton Farm, near Sturminster Marshall


Category: Dorset Energized News, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy
Tags: , , ,


Proposed solar development at Mapperton Farm, near Sturminster Marshall

Good Energy, the 100% renewable electricity supplier, encourages you to have your say on its proposed solar farm in East Dorset.

As you may know, Good Energy is a 100% renewable electricity supplier dedicated to helping the UK achieve a future that’s powered purely by renewables.

In addition to our first solar farm near Wool in Dorset, we’re committed to developing further renewable electricity generation capacity to help build energy security for the UK and tackle climate change. This is where our proposed solar development at Mapperton Farm, near Sturminster Marshall, comes in.

If it gets the go-ahead, this project will generate enough renewable electricity to supply around 6,000 average homes*, making a significant contribution to Dorset’s renewable energy targets.

This site itself is in a sparsely populated area that is naturally screened from view by the surrounding landscape. It is outside any conservation areas but it will also benefit from various measures designed to increase the wildlife value of the site.

The local area will receive a range of community benefits including a locally-controlled fund of £35,000 per year to support local initiatives. You can read more about the community benefits package here.

Our proposals are due to be considered by the planning committee at East Dorset District Council within the next few weeks. Local voices like yours could make all the difference to the future of this important project, so we urge you to register your support for our planning application.

You can submit your comments by registering on the Council’s planning website here or by e-mailing JBrightman@ christchurchandeastdorset.gov. uk quoting the application number 3/13/0681/FUL. Alternatively you can write to the planning officer as follows:

FAO James Brightman

Planning Applications (East Dorset)

Council Offices

Furzehill

Wimborne

BH21 4HN

 

We would urge you to make sure that your comments are submitted by Friday 12th June to ensure that they can be taken into account in the planning officers report.

Further information about the project is available on Good Energy’s website: www.goodenergy.co.uk/ dorsetsolar/mapperton-farm.  I f you have any questions or comments about the project, please get in touch viamappertonsolar@goodenergy. co.uk.



26
MAY

Lets Get Energized says:
News from Regen SW


Category: Community Energy, Energy News for UK, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Uncategorized
Tags: , , , ,


News from Regen SW

regen logo

Community and localised energy supply can benefit consumers, renewable generators and network operators. However, there are still many commercial and regulatory barriers to selling the energy you generate directly to your local community. In the context of increasing grid constraints, we need to look at how local supply can help overcome this barrier. So where do we go from here?

Sign the 10:10 petition to buy your power direct from local wind, solar and hydro here.

Join us for the Community Energy Markets Conference, 25 June, Bristol.

This conference will address the next steps for community energy markets. We will examine what local supply projects are currently in place, what issues they have faced and how policy or regulation can help solve these problems.

Sessions include:

  • Policy overview and context
  • Examples of local supply models
  • How local supply can overcome grid constraints
Confirmed speakers:
  • Fiona Booth, head of community energy, DECC
  • Jeff Hardy, sustainable energy policy team, OFGEM
  • Sonya Bedford, partner, Stephens Scown
To book for this conference please click here.Regen are offering community energy groups in our network a discount of £75 off the members rate bringing it to £50 + VAT.Full details and booking are available here.  Use the code ‘discount’ when making your booking.


24
MAY

Vince Adams says:
Dorset Community Energy – Share Offer launch Friday 5th June 7:00pm


Category: Community Energy, Energy Events in Dorset, Renewable Energy, Uncategorized
Tags:


Dorset Community Energy – Share Offer launch Friday 5th June 7:00pm

Wessex Royale Hotel, High West Street, Dorchester

Dorset Community Energy is a not-for-profit Community Benefit Society supported by the Big Lottery ‘Communities Living Sustainably in Dorset’ programme to install community- financed solar photovoltaic panels (PV) on the roofs of 6 local schools or village halls. Three village hall solar panel installations, Martinstown, Salway Ash and Osmington have already been completed using a short term bridging loan, to be repaid through the community share offer. Three school solar PV installations, Dorchester Middle School, Thomas Hardye School, Dorchester and Lytchett Minster School are planned for August, subject to final School Governors’ approval and raising sufficient capital through the community share offer.

Key points:

·         The 6 participating schools and village halls will receive free electricity from the solar panels – estimated to be worth a total of £200,000 over a period of 20 years

·         The business model includes a projected return of 5%- 6% per year for investors

·         Minimum investment £100 maximum £10,000

·         Capital will be repaid in instalments between years 4-20

·         Taxpayers may be eligible for 50% tax relief on their investment.

·         The Share Offer will be open between 5th June and 4th July 2015

·         Note that investment in shares in a Community Benefit Society is not the same as savings in a bank account. In general it carries higher risks set out in the Share Offer Document, which will be published on Friday 5th June. If necessary potential investors should seek independent financial advice.

Further information:

Please see www.dorsetcommunityenergy.org.uk

The Share Offer Document and application form for shares will be uploaded to the website on 5th June

An information evening and share offer launch event has been arranged on Friday 5thJune at 7:00pm in the Wessex Royale Hotel, High West Street, Dorchester. Printed copies of the Share Offer Document will be available at the event and an opportunity to question Dorset Community Energy directors and their professional advisors for the Share Offer, Sharenergy.


1Comments | Post your own comment

  • Vince Adams comments:
    "Best wishes to the Dorset Community Energy launch and for further information about the North Dorset initiative EnergizeSturvlalley log onto to ESVIPS.com "
    May 24, 2015 a 7:31 am


05
MAY

Anna Celeste Watson says:
Where the Parties stand on Green Issues for the UK General Election 2015


Category: Climate Change, Energy News for UK, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Living, Wildlife & Nature
Tags: ,


Just a quick post as its Election Week to recommend you check out Friends of the Earth’s page on the Election manifestos: highs and lows to help you understand where all the parties stand on key environmental issues.

You can also check out www.bbc.co.uk/news/election/2015/manifesto-guide then select ‘Environment’ under the issues which include; energy supply, climate change, flooding and air and water quality.

Hope this helps you to decide how to use your vote this week to help make a difference for the environmental and energy issues that will massively affect each and everyone one of us.

I also recommend checking out Animal Aid’s Vote for Animals website to find out your MPs policy towards wildlife, farm animals and pets on www.voteforanimals.org.uk


3Comments | Post your own comment

  • vince adams comments:
    "There is one thing we can all do, take a look at this !!
    This report by a Duke University Professor interested me: “As Duke University Professor Drew Shindell noted recently: [D]amages from a typical mid-range gasoline-powered vehicle total nearly $2,000 a year. In comparison, annual damages associated with an electric vehicle are around $1,000 if the power comes exclusively from coal, about $300 if the power is generated using natural gas, and minimal if the electricity is from renewable sources.
    The World Health Organization estimates that around 7 million people die per year as a result of air pollution exposure, and, as organizations across the board are noting, ocean acidification that hurts fisheries is a threat to both local economies and the people who rely on the ocean as a food source” It means my electric car using my own renewable energy is almost carbon free. It also means that I’m not adding to air pollution which I believe to be one of the most serious threats to our health and the Planet. My own 2nd generation Leaf will soon be up for sale as I am upgrading so anyone who is interested let me know, I don’t wish to profit from a sale but it will need a good home and be at a very fair market price with no commissions etc "

    May 10, 2015 a 11:59 am

  • Anna Celeste comments:
    "Hi Karl, it is very disappointing news for our environment and animals too. I read a great response from Animal Aid though with regards to how its people that really change things – it relates to animal welfare but it can apply to green issues too, in that we can all support renewable energy at home and in our communities, and support green organisations who are fighting to protect our planet – its on http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/n/NEWS/news_living//3263// "
    May 8, 2015 a 1:28 pm

  • Karl Bristol comments:
    "I fear the worst after today’s results; our environment is in desperate need of saving and it looks like this simply will not be happening "
    May 8, 2015 a 1:17 pm


28
APR

Guest Energizer says:
DARPA Algae Biofuels Program and Future Jet Fuels


Category: Climate Change, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Living
Tags:


DARPA Algae Biofuels Program and Future Jet Fuel Solutions

Have you ever imagined that the future of jet fuels may actually lie in algae or other alternative solutions other than kerosene? If that is the case, then you would be glad to hear of the program the US Department of Defense has been working on over the past years, attempting to find a more sustainable solution for aviation that stays away from the excessive consumption of petroleum fuels. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency or DARPA, the people that gave the world ARPANET, which served as the basis of the internet are working on a great many projects at the same time, some with purely military applications, while others have a much wider range of use that could easily find their ways into the civilian world, much like ARPANET did back in the late 60s.

The scientific minds behind the DoD’s most dedicated think tank have their projects ranging from robotics to biotechnology, but this particular project for biofuel implementation seems like a promising step toward a more eco-friendly solutions for aviation needs worldwide. As this program’s main goal is to reduce the incredible reliance upon imported oil, DARPA scientists have been working on a renewable jet fuel known as JP-8 that aims to not only meet, but also exceed the performance metrics of the more traditional sources of jet fuel.

This type of fuel will be derived from a cellulose base materials and algae that won’t compete with food crops. The best part of the goals of the JP-8 project is the intention to create a stable fuel that acts in a way to allow easy integration with current engine systems and fuel storage without adjustments to airplanes. While still in development, the program has a promising future due to a number of factors, such as lowered fuel costs overall, fewer carbon emissions and a lower carbon footprint for global air travel without the need for expensive retrofitting of existing aircraft.

DARPA has ties to many of the scientific communities out there, which have often been used to create life-changing solutions worldwide, such as the phone app Siri, originally an offshoot of the CALO project funded by DARPA. The Biofuels program has accomplished a number of large steps toward completion of the project; mostly in ensuring algae and cellulose can be safely and effectively used to create a feedstock for the JP-8 fuel. General Atomics handle the algae project, while Logos Technologies are working on the cellulosic approach as part of the concentrated efforts to make the project work.

The effort to make cellulose fuel more widespread is still ongoing with further developments to follow in the coming years, but the future of air travel looks to finally and possibly be cheaper if civilian implementation of this type of fuel becomes more widespread. The applications of this can have far-reaching effects on the economy, being a boost to trade, moving companies and logistics and relocation of trade goods everywhere. While the boon to commercial passenger aviation should not be underestimated, the greatest benefit will still end up being cargo shipping across the globe, whether it is by companies or movers. What the project will create in the end as a finished result still remains to be seen in the near future.

This post is by Guest Energizer Sofia Lewis for: Van removal services in Westminster. She is a passionate freelance article writer and blogger. She is inspired by home improvement projects and writes mainly about house removals, storage, office relocation, green living home solutions, other home related topics.



27
APR

Anna Celeste Watson says:
Ecotricity Founder talks about his politic donations for the 2015 General Election & greening up football


Category: Climate Change, Fuel Poverty & Security, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Renewable Energy Film/Video
Tags: ,


With less than 2 weeks to go before the UK General Election, we thought we should share this recent video of Dale Vince, Founder of Green Energy Suppliers Ecotricity, talking about his politic donations for the 2015 General Election, and greening up football…

Our Lets Get Energized and Dorset Energized team, predominentaly ran by volunteers, are obviously keen that we offer a non-biased political opinion, but of course green energy in the UK is so dependent on the decisions made by government that it would be silly to ignore politics altogether at such a time. I should point out that I myself have no political affiliations at all, so am just as ignorant to politics as most everyday members of the public!

It goes without saying (but I will say it anyway) that there is only one party fully committed to green energy issues as a key part of their agenda, and that is of course the Green Party, so it may come as a surprise to many renewable energy supporters (like it did to me) to learn that the Founder of Ecotricity has not donated to the Green Party, but to Labour AND also to the Liberal Democrats.

Ecotricity have however previously donated money to the Green Party, specifically Caroline Lucas’ campaign, and continue to do so via a partnership arrangement, where they donate up to £60 per sign up of any new green energy customer. This has apparently been hugely successful since the membership numbers have increased significantly.

Interviewed by Robert Llewellyn (Kryten from Red Dwarf!), Dale discusses the Green issues which he thinks need to get more air time in the election debate, his donations, and why he thinks there needs to be a leaders debate if we are to really tackle the environmental issues we face.

Soundbites include:

“The idea that we could run the whole country by renewable energy is not just a pipe dream, it’s absolutely possible”

“It seems to me that the Conservatives have made this a presidential election”

“A leaders debate would be the most useful thing for all of us in the country so we can make a better judgement about the qualities of the two people who are pitching to run the country”

“The conservative ideology is a failed ideology”

“We should have a ministry of carbon, whose job is to focus on the carbon emissions from energy, transport and food”



16
APR

Anna Celeste Watson says:
Infographic: ECOnomic Benefits of the Feed-in Tariff Scheme


Category: Renewable Energy
Tags: ,


Just a quick one to share this great infographic that we have been sent by Adept on the Feed-in Tariff Scheme for UK homeowners.

Using data from Ofgem and the UK Government, this infographic shows some of the reasons why having an eco-friendly home can mean lower bills and a more sustainable future:

ECOnomic Benefits of the Feed-in Tariff Scheme Infographic

By Adept Concepts – ECOnomic Benefits of the Feed-in Tariff Scheme



08
APR

Conor MacGuire says:
Renewable Energy – Power Your Home More Effectively and Efficiently


Category: Biomass Energy, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy, Water Power, Wind Power
Tags:


In the recent years, the rising costs of energy have boosted the overall cost of living to all new heights. Thus, it now becomes necessary for the homeowners to set their sights on the alternative energy sources. These sources reduce both, energy dependence and expense to a significant amount.

As the fear of ending conventional sources of energy rises, the homemakers have started weighing other options for their energy consumption. More and more people now ought to invest in alternative energy resources of energy, and it seems to be a growing market. Along this, a number of states now offer rebates, tax credits, and other incentives to promote clean energy. So, now it’s your turn to switch to these energy sources, before it gets too late. Read out here to find some promising solutions, which can help power your home efficiently and effectively:

renewable-energy

Solar

When it comes to renewable sources, ‘Solar energy’ is the first to strike your brain. The reason for its ever increasing popularity is that it is the easiest solution, or better say, one of the most easily accessible. For your home, all you need is the photo-voltaic solar panels, batteries and an inverter.

The performance depends greatly on the region you are residing, for example, the location having sunny and brighter days for most of the time per year will show better results. But, that doesn’t mean the areas with less sunlight cannot use solar panels. Even, if the temperature falls off, the solar energy users can still keep their homes warm and bright.

Another advantage of solar energy is that it demands a little maintenance. The solar panels once installed, can provide large amounts of electricity and don’t ask for repairs often.

Wind

Do you know that wind energy is the second most widely used renewable source? But, many homemakers associate it with those mammoth wind farms, neglecting their usage at home. The fact which remains silent is that there are a number of small sized turbines available, perfect for producing a significant amount of energy.

So, it is a valuable solution for those looking for non- conventional sources. The speed of the wind in your region will decide over the right solution for your home. You can seek help from the weather services, they will let you know the average wind speed in your region.

Undoubtedly, bigger turbines are capable of generating a large amount of energy, but you can use a 10-kilowatt turbine for your home. It is 100 feet tall, the turbine is nearly 23 feet and is sufficient to produce enough energy for a house.

Micro Hydro Electricity

This is an effective solution and its installation is much easier. Warning!!! – It is ideal only if you live near moving water.

All you need is to place a pipe, running from the higher area (where water is flowing) to a lower piece of ground. As the water moves downhill, turns the turbine at the end of the pipe, energy is produced. Surprisingly, a number of micro hydro systems have been known to produce ten or even 100 times more power than wind or solar. Moreover, it is more efficient than the two other sources, as it can run non-stop and overnight.

Biomass

As far as the use of biomass for your home is considered, it usually includes the stove used to heat water or for general home heating. You can use plants, including wood waste, grass, crops or trees to fuel your stoves. It is sometimes reported to pollute the air, but it is still a green option as it produces less pollution than those fossil fuels, which involves burning of harsh chemicals.

So, there is a multitude of combinations available. Now, it depends on your budget to achieve energy independence with help of these renewable sources!

UK Gov is inspiring folks to use these technologies and providing loan under the scheme like Green Deal. If you need green deal in Scotland then contact Green Energy Scotland Limited for your needs. UK Gov is also running another scheme called: Renewable Heat Incentive Scheme. The Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) is the world’s first long-term financial support programme for renewable heat. The RHI pays participants of the scheme that generate and use renewable energy to heat their buildings.



01
APR

Keith Wheaton-Green says:
Who should you vote for if Climate Change and Renewable Energy are important to you?


Category: Renewable Energy, Sustainable Living, Wind Power
Tags: , , ,


Who should you vote for if Climate Change and Renewable Energy are important to you?

I put party attitudes in two categories. Twentieth century concepts of centralised energy generation, fossil fuel and nuclear technologies and a reluctance to push forward with renewables quickly to avoid the worst effects of a changed climate future, dominate UKIP and Conservative thinking. Decentralisation, strong government incentives for a rapid switch to renewables, lack of sympathy for entrenched fossil fuel dominated companies and a sense that climate change is a fairness issue because the poorest in the country/the world cannot pay to get themselves out of the firing line of flooding, sea level rise and drought characterise the other parties.

Rather surprisingly, considering their appreciation of the need to “be independent and take control of our own destiny” UKIP have not made any link between home grown renewable energy, UK resilience and reduced dependence on energy from “dodgy” countries. Instead, they express intense dislike for wind turbines in particular and “renewable energy subsidies which penalise consumers.” Let’s be honest, generally speaking, UKIPers don’t accept the premise that man-made climate change is a serious threat to our well-being. It’s clear that UKIP MPs will not be voting for any government promotion of renewable energy.

The Greens have an extensive set of policies relating to renewable energy, energy efficiency and energy storage. They want to see “a complete transformation of our energy supply systems to one based on efficient use of energy supplied mainly by electricity from renewable sources, accelerated heat production from renewable sources, improved energy performance of buildings, heat and energy storage, stimulation of research and development, a land and sea framework for development of renewable energy, a diversity of ownership of energy generation and energy democracy. Green MPs would evidently be voting to support renewables, as well as challenging bills that prevent or slow down development of renewables.

Conservatives support the current regime of continually reducing renewables subsidies. They promise to end the on shore wind turbine subsidy (currently the cheapest renewable!) and restrict new solar farms. Eric Pickles has called in nearly all recent planning permissions for on-shore wind turbines and quite a few solar farms. They much prefer on roof PV and would support changes in planning law to encourage this. Conservatives are enthusiastic supporters of fracking and value the contribution fossil fuels make to the economy. One senses their support for renewables is conditional, that they don’t understand the full potential of renewables to growing the economy, and would expect renewables to flourish in spite of, rather than because of, government policies.

A Labour government set up the Feed in tariff, the Renewable heat Incentive and a pathway to zero carbon homes. The coalition have continued these. More recently, Labour have announced policies on energy efficiency, interest free home improvement loans, replacement of Ofgem and freezing energy prices. Labour have a good track record with renewables and have recently stated that they “will support community energy, and explore the huge potential for individuals and communities to create and save energy through community ownership and collective consumer action.” They have not explained the instruments they would use but it seems likely that Labour would provide strong support for renewables.

Liberal Democrat controlled DECC has overseen huge expansion of PV and off-shore wind against Conservative scepticism. Their manifesto includes “doubling renewable electricity and heat generation by 2020, making the UK zero carbon by 2050, a zero carbon bill with a legally binding decarbonisation target for the power sector up to 2030, an office for accelerated low carbon innovation to fast-track new green tech including tidal power, renewable heat, ultra-low emission vehicles and energy storage.” It’s clear that a strong Liberal Democrat presence in parliament is good for the renewables industry.

The economy is the second most important issue for voters so we should focus on the fact that every pound invested in renewables contributes £3.20 to GDP and £1.27 in taxes. The UK could be self-sufficient in renewable energy, thus giving us a more resilient economy. To achieve this, the renewables industry wants stable financial and regulatory support while it matures and drives costs down. I think that’s worth voting for.



25
MAR

John Olver says:
Argument over solar subsidies in the UK


Category: Climate Change, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy, Uncategorized
Tags: , ,


Argument over solar subsidies in the UK

The UK, as with the rest of the world, has seen a dramatic surge in solar power generation over the past few years. the cost of solar panels has dropped quickly and governments have subsidized the industry. Now governments are considering cutting these subsidies because solar is beginning to be competitive with fossil fuels. I would agree with this action if governments would also cut the subsidies they have been giving to fossil fuel companies since the inception of that industry.

Fossil fuel companies have never had to pay the cost of the environmental damage they do when extracting or burning their products. Neither have fossil fuel companies had to pay for the damage to human health caused by their products. Paying these costs would make sustainable energy sources more than competitive and that’s why the fossil fuel industry contributes so much to political campaigns around the world. Consumer prices would go up for fossil fuel energy but come down for sustainable sources and that would bring a cleaner world sooner rather than later.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-32028809


1Comments | Post your own comment

  • Bristolboy comments:
    "In terms of UK solar I would say the feed in tariff cuts for small scale solar (eg building mounted) are suitable and the new way in which cuts are relative to install rates are suitable. This is shown by install rates being very constant, indicating that the feed in tariff cuts correspond well to install cost reductions. The major issue at the moment is that the subsidy cuts for large scale solar that were effective from 1st April have been too extreme. Previously such projects were getting 1.4 ROCs/MWh which was probably too generous following capex falls, hence the large number of solar farms appearing over the last year or so. However, they now have to compete for Contracts for Difference (CFDs) against onshore wind projects which is something solar is unable to do until further capex reductions occur. "
    April 12, 2015 a 5:23 pm


13
MAR

John Olver says:
EV’s are not good for the environment!


Category: Electric Transport, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Living
Tags: , , ,


EV’s are not good for the environment!

That headline or similar claims have been floating about the media for some time now. A 2014 study by the University of Minnesota among others found that EV’s can contribute to global pollution if the source of the electricity they use is not clean. Why the headlines don’t read, “Coal Fired Power Plants are a Threat to Civilization” instead of lambasting EV’s is no mystery. Most of the articles quickly get to this point but headlines lambasting coal fired power plants don’t draw the eyeballs that anti-EV banners do and media of all sorts depends on attracting eyeballs for validation. The potential number of EV’s on the road is far greater than the number of power plants so why not focus the cleanup at the source.

The fact is that EV’s are good for the environment. You can power them with wind, solar, hydro, nuclear and yes, fossil fuel. But whatever the source EV’s don’t go around spewing CO2 and other pollutants into cities towns and the countryside. If clean up is required it can be done at the source.

Additionally, if you choose to power your EV with sustainably derived electricity you do away with the need to transport explosive and toxic materials around the world in ships, trains, trucks and pipelines and avoid all the spillage associated with that transport. EV’s don’t require mountaintop mining, deep sea oil drilling or other destructive extractive processes.

100605091242BP_Gulf_Oil_Spill_Affected_Wildlife_Images30

Technologies are already available to scrub pollutants from power plant stacks but that would add to the cost of electricity. Most consumers would rather pretend that the hundreds of billions of dollars, pounds, rand, yen, etc. added to global health costs by the fossil fuel industry do not exist and that the rise in power cost would be far more onerous than the heart disease, lung disease, lower intelligence in offspring and many other problems associated with fossil fuels.

And by the way, if fossil fuel companies were required to clean up their messes the price of fossil fuels would be quite a bit higher than the price of sustainable energy. This cost adjustment would drive the sustainable industry, technological improvements would follow rapidly due to the increase in research funding and the world would be a much cleaner place.

EV’s are not the problem, the problem our insistence on “cheap” energy no matter what the true cost.


2Comments | Post your own comment

  • Bristolboy comments:
    "I agree fully with your smmary that it ultimately depends on the source of the electricity. In the UK the carbon emissions associated with electricity generation for a typical electric car like the Nissan Leaf are as good or better than the best diesels. However, this is getting better all the time due to higher renewables penetration. I would also estimate that those with electric cars are much more likely to be on “renewable” supply tariffs or have solar panels on their house and therefore will have lower emissions than the UK average. Of course, electric cars produce no emissions (other than manufacture) in countries where grid electricity is 100% renewable such as Norway, Iceland and Costa Rica and in these countries electric cars win hands down. "
    April 12, 2015 a 5:13 pm

  • vince adams comments:
    "Get the message, we are being feed rubbish from the Media to protect the existing forces of power, its time to wake and see whats happening before our own eyes or it will be to late. "
    March 15, 2015 a 10:12 am


20
FEB

Lets Get Energized says:
Fracking & Better Energy Solutions – Talk in Bridport Dorset, 12th March


Category: Climate Change, Energy Events in Dorset, Fracking, Fuel Poverty & Security, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Living
Tags: , , , ,


fracking-bridport

Fracking & Better Energy Solutions

Talk by Charles Miller
Thursday 12 March 2015

Doors open 7pm for 7.30pm start
Bridport Town Hall, Dorset

Admission FREE

West Dorset Friends of the Earth group are delighted to invite you to this interesting and informative talk regarding fracking, presented by Charles Miller.

With twenty-five years experience in the oil industry worldwide, Charles Miller gives a brief outline of the Energy Crisis. He will then explains the problems with Fracking and safer and sustainable Energy solutions that other countries are choosing instead of Fracking, to protect their citizens and countryside and to keep energy bills from rising.

There will be time for your questions at the end of the talk.

We hope to see you there.



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