Archive for ‘Green Electricity & Gas’


29
FEB

Vince Adams says:
Ovo a new way to purchase your energy


Category: Energy Deals & Offers, Green Electricity & Gas, Uncategorized
Tags:


OVO Energy are a different kind of energy supplier. Six years ago OVO Energy started out as a kitchen table chat between a couple of friends who wanted to create an energy supplier that actually did what people want. A supplier which had fairer prices, more transparency over pricing and where energy comes from. A supplier with great customer service, the technology to make managing your energy easier and above all a focus on sustainability and the environment.

Today OVO have over half a million satisfied customers and are working harder than ever to make customers energy supply as easy and as inexpensive as possible.

OVO Energy strive to offer their customers two things. Firstly, an energy mix of gas and electricity from the greenest and secondly, energy from the most sustainable sources available and at the best possible price. OVO’s mix of energy comes from natural gas and renewable sources whilst avoiding energy generated from coal.
Fairer fuel
Just one of the ways in which OVO brings fairer energy prices is through its ‘Communities’ initiative. OVO communities aims to bring energy to customers from local sources whilst cutting costs (and thus prices as well as reducing carbon emissions. Consumers in these areas have access to greener, cheaper energy which is generated, bought and run by local communities. Another bonus for consumers is that it brings more secure long term energy tariffs

OVO have set up several community partnerships with local authorities such as Cheshire East Council, Peterborough City Council and Southend-on-Sea Borough Council. These community partnerships aim to tackle fuel poverty through measures (such as in Cheshire East) by operating on a not-for-profit basis.

OVO are an independent energy supplier. This means that they do not generate energy in their own power stations but buy it on the open market from a whole range of suppliers. OVO Energy buys their gas and electricity from different power generators from around the country. This allows OVO to constantly buy energy at the best possible price, passing savings on to customers, whilst ensuring that they can always buy the cleanest, greenest energy available on the market at an affordable price. This is something OVO Energy calls ‘mainstream green’.

Not generating their own fuel, but buying from the energy market allows OVO to offer some of the most competitive gas and electricity rates on the consumer market. Part of the way OVO does this is through dual fuel plans or dual fuel tariffs.
What does ‘Dual Fuel’ mean?

Dual fuel can be a cheaper way to pay for your electricity and gas. A ‘dual fuel’ tariff bundles both electricity and gas from the same supplier into a single energy contract, pricing plan and bill. Energy suppliers like dual fuel tariffs as they get more income when customers take both energy sources from them so often push consumers to take these plans. So are dual fuel tariffs just good for energy companies?

No. A lot of people find dual fuel tariffs are convenient and save time and money with only one bill to worry about paying and a single supplier to deal with if there are any problems. As energy suppliers actively want customers to take dual fuel tariffs they often offer extra discounts for customers who sign up to these plans.



26
MAY

Lets Get Energized says:
News from Regen SW


Category: Community Energy, Energy News for UK, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Uncategorized
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News from Regen SW

regen logo

Community and localised energy supply can benefit consumers, renewable generators and network operators. However, there are still many commercial and regulatory barriers to selling the energy you generate directly to your local community. In the context of increasing grid constraints, we need to look at how local supply can help overcome this barrier. So where do we go from here?

Sign the 10:10 petition to buy your power direct from local wind, solar and hydro here.

Join us for the Community Energy Markets Conference, 25 June, Bristol.

This conference will address the next steps for community energy markets. We will examine what local supply projects are currently in place, what issues they have faced and how policy or regulation can help solve these problems.

Sessions include:

  • Policy overview and context
  • Examples of local supply models
  • How local supply can overcome grid constraints
Confirmed speakers:
  • Fiona Booth, head of community energy, DECC
  • Jeff Hardy, sustainable energy policy team, OFGEM
  • Sonya Bedford, partner, Stephens Scown
To book for this conference please click here.Regen are offering community energy groups in our network a discount of £75 off the members rate bringing it to £50 + VAT.Full details and booking are available here.  Use the code ‘discount’ when making your booking.


13
MAY

Lets Get Energized says:
NORTH DORSET OPEN ECO-HOMES EVENT 15-17 MAY


Category: Dorset Energized News, Energy Events in Dorset, Green Electricity & Gas, Uncategorized
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NORTH DORSET OPEN ECO-HOMES EVENT 15-17 MAY

Do you want to save money on your energy bills? Are you thinking of installing renewable energy at home? Want to reduce your impact on the environment or encourage more wildlife into your garden?

North Dorset District Council’s Eco Homes Event may be the ideal opportunity to find out answers to your questions from those who have already done it.

Paul McIntosh, Sustainability Officer for the council, said: “Seventeen homes and projects with eco-friendly features will be open for people to visit over the weekend of 15 – 17 May and they are all viewable on the website http://northdorset.greenopenhomes.net/  Some homes are open to visit all weekend while others have specific open times or need to be booked – please check on the website or in the booklet.”

Booklets are being distributed in many venues across the district with details of the properties.  You can also phone or email the project co-ordinator, Kathryn Flint, on 01258 484372 and kflint@north-dorset.gov.uk for help and information.

Venues include a Franciscan Friary, a water mill, farms and many private homes all linked by the desire to meet the challenges of the changing world of energy supply and sustainability.

There is something for everyone even if you have never given much thought to the energy you use in your home before. If you have, then this might be just the thing to spur you on to a new eco-friendly project!


1Comments | Post your own comment

  • Kathryn Flint comments:
    "There is still time to book for the weekend. Just give me a call on 01258 484732.
    Thanks for sharing this LGE team. "

    May 15, 2015 a 3:31 pm


27
APR

Anna Celeste Watson says:
Ecotricity Founder talks about his politic donations for the 2015 General Election & greening up football


Category: Climate Change, Fuel Poverty & Security, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Renewable Energy Film/Video
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With less than 2 weeks to go before the UK General Election, we thought we should share this recent video of Dale Vince, Founder of Green Energy Suppliers Ecotricity, talking about his politic donations for the 2015 General Election, and greening up football…

Our Lets Get Energized and Dorset Energized team, predominentaly ran by volunteers, are obviously keen that we offer a non-biased political opinion, but of course green energy in the UK is so dependent on the decisions made by government that it would be silly to ignore politics altogether at such a time. I should point out that I myself have no political affiliations at all, so am just as ignorant to politics as most everyday members of the public!

It goes without saying (but I will say it anyway) that there is only one party fully committed to green energy issues as a key part of their agenda, and that is of course the Green Party, so it may come as a surprise to many renewable energy supporters (like it did to me) to learn that the Founder of Ecotricity has not donated to the Green Party, but to Labour AND also to the Liberal Democrats.

Ecotricity have however previously donated money to the Green Party, specifically Caroline Lucas’ campaign, and continue to do so via a partnership arrangement, where they donate up to £60 per sign up of any new green energy customer. This has apparently been hugely successful since the membership numbers have increased significantly.

Interviewed by Robert Llewellyn (Kryten from Red Dwarf!), Dale discusses the Green issues which he thinks need to get more air time in the election debate, his donations, and why he thinks there needs to be a leaders debate if we are to really tackle the environmental issues we face.

Soundbites include:

“The idea that we could run the whole country by renewable energy is not just a pipe dream, it’s absolutely possible”

“It seems to me that the Conservatives have made this a presidential election”

“A leaders debate would be the most useful thing for all of us in the country so we can make a better judgement about the qualities of the two people who are pitching to run the country”

“The conservative ideology is a failed ideology”

“We should have a ministry of carbon, whose job is to focus on the carbon emissions from energy, transport and food”



19
JAN

Keith Wheaton-Green says:
100% renewable and self sufficient North Dorset in Electricity – here`s how


Category: Dorset Energized News, Green Electricity & Gas, Solar Energy, Uncategorized, Water Power, Wind Power
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100% renewable and self sufficient North Dorset in Electricity – here`s how

The most recent statistics from the Department of Energy and Climate Change show that North Dorset consumes 290.8 GWh/yr

The last census shows 30,397 households, only 11% of those being flats. Quite a few of these dwellings already have PV installed on their roofs but that number is likely to increase substantially when PV becomes so cheap that it will make better financial sense to install it than pay for all your electricity from the grid. This grid parity (without subsidy) is expected to come about as early as 2020. More than half of houses have close to south facing roof space and it’s reasonable to assume that 60% or so could accommodate a 4 kW array. These would generate around 65 GWh/yr

There are 3,800 businesses in North Dorset including farms. Not all will have their own roof space but all those steel sheds on industrial estates and agricultural barns have low pitched roofs that are viable for PV whatever their orientation. A quick look at Google Earth shows at least 50 big enough to take around 50 kW in the towns and farm barns would probably double that. So I estimate these could generate 5 GWh/yr.

There are already quite a few large and small ground mounted solar farms installed and enough space to generate the equivalent of the districts needs without impacting food production. A reasonably large solar farm is 10 MW generating 10 GWh/yr so 29 of those would equate to the district’s annual consumption.

There are at least 6 small 20 kW wind turbines (up to 20 m mast and 7 m blades) in North Dorset tucked away virtually un-noticed. The landscape could easily accommodate 50 small turbines without travellers and walkers constantly coming across them. They could generate 0.35 GWh/yr.

The River Stour and its tributaries already has 4 hydro turbines installed at mills and weirs with another 5 to be installed soon and potential for at least 6. They range from 3.7 to 89 kW and in total could generate 1.75 GWh/yr.

Now the elephant in the room, which is big wind power They may be very much out of favour with a vocal minority punching well above their weight but the fact is that a 2.3MW on-shore wind turbine is the cheapest source of renewable electricity. It would require 60 of these to generate the equivalent of all the district’s electricity and that could not be accommodated easily. I would say a maximum of 20 could be found a home and 10 would be more realistic and they could generate 48.5 GWh/yr

So North Dorset could generate equivalent to all its electrical need with;

65 GWh/yr from domestic roof tops

5 GWh/yr from commercial and agricultural roof tops

0.35 GWh/yr from small wind turbines

1.75 GWh/yr from hydropower

That leaves 218.7 GWh/yr to be found from a combination of large solar farms and wind turbines. Personally, I would like to see 10 large wind turbines, some of those to be clearly viewed from my back garden. That would mean 17 x 10 MW solar farms to take up the slack.


1Comments | Post your own comment

  • vince adams comments:
    "Keith gives a cogent and totally understandable summary of how North Dorset with just a number of small steps could create 100% of its energy needs renewably.
    Think what if every district, County did a similar exercise how simple going renewable could be and how we could see the end of coal, gas and nuclear power for ever.
    This is now not in the realms of fairy stories its hard economic sense and will support reductions in climate change temps and give us better air quality all at the sametime. "

    January 19, 2015 a 6:42 pm


17
DEC

Erik Blakeley says:
Renewable Energy Salesmen?


Category: Climate Change, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy, Uncategorized, Wind Power
Tags: , , , ,


Renewable Energy Salesmen?

I used to think that the climate change deniers paid for by big fossil firms and anti-renewable  NIMBYs were the worst threats to progress in the fight to cut emissions of GHGs and slow Climate Change but I have recently come across possibly a more sinister and depressing opponent – the Renewable Energy snake oil salesman! These people, either through genuine but misguided enthusiasm or through a malicious wish to fool people into investing in schemes that are about as likely to bear fruit as chocolate teapot manufacture, come up with a way off piste suggestion for a grandiose scheme to solve all of our energy and climate change worries. Now don’t get me wrong I am all in favour of “out of the box” or “blues sky” thinking, but they go straight from some vaguely worked out concept diagram to claims that all further investment in wind or PV or any other low carbon technology are now redundant and pointless. They are one step further into lunacy than the magic bullet salesmen who think that one of the current technologies, be it wind or PV or nuclear, is a one size fits all answer to all our problems.

Why are they so bad? Well at some point they are going to try to persuade people who are concerned about the problems of Climate Change and Energy Security to invest money in these schemes, money that could be invested in home insulation, roof top PV or community wind or hydro projects for example. At least the NIMBYs and climate change deniers are only trying to persuade people to ignore the science and the need for action. The snake oil salesmen nobble the people who have been persuaded to care. They cannot do what is sensible which is to propose an idea for development and try to get universities or industry to make small scale investments to produce trial prototypes or even just to put their ideas out for peer review because they know full well that they will be rejected as deeply flawed or just physically or economically impossible. Instead they launch some small development company and produce a flash looking sales video on U-tube purporting to be a “lecture” on the merits of their scheme and then try to get money out of small investors or crowdfunding. These people are only one step removed from the guy who sold empty plastic boxes with car radio aerials glued to the outside as bomb detectors.

The other really bad thing that they do is to give ammunition to those who oppose wind turbines or PV farms because they suggest that we don’t need to deploy the current crop of well-developed technologies because there is some magic wand solution just around the corner if only the mainstream scientific and industrial cartel will stop suppressing these wonderful inventions. When challenged the snake oil salesman will readily claim to be the victim of conspiracies and prejudice – they can be quite paranoid.

New technologies will come along and in 50 to 100 years we will almost certainly be deploying a markedly different mix of low carbon technologies than we are today but for now we need to deploy as much as possible of the good range of well-developed kit as we possibly can. Universities and big business can pursue the blue sky stuff and take the financial risk. If you have a few hundred or even a few thousand to invest put it into something established and don’t be taken in by the snake oil salesmen!


1Comments | Post your own comment

  • Vince Adams comments:
    "I was talking to a friend this week and he said that quietly Countries all over the World were making amazing progress turning from old energy solutions towards Renewables whereas the UK appeared to be dragging its feet.
    This headline caught my eye and I wondered, is that the reason why ? Does UK big business have far to much influence ? “Electricity customers in the U.S. got good news last week. A new report from Accenture highlighted a potential revenue loss for U.S. utilities of $48 billion per year by 2025 due to distributed solar and energy efficiency” How do we ensure that the UK is not left behind ? "

    December 17, 2014 a 6:07 pm


11
DEC

Lets Get Energized says:
Green energy suppliers Ecotricity have lowest industry complaints for 5th year running & announce prize freeze until April 2015!


Category: Energy Deals & Offers, Energy News for UK, Green Electricity & Gas
Tags: ,


ecotricity-lowest-number-of-complaints

The latest Which? customer service satisfaction survey has revealed that the Big Six energy companies have lost 2 million customers but complaints are up by a third.

nPower have the highest average complaints in the industry, whereas 100% Gloucestershire based green energy suppliers Ecotricity have the lowest industry complaints and impressively for the 5th year running (receiving only 0.86 complaints per 1000 customers in 2014) which is great news, although of course we are not surprised as many of our Lets Get Energized team are happy customers for our home energy supply!

Click here for a summary of the the Which? energy supplier complaints league table >>

Ecotricity have also announced that they have cut switching times to 17 days and are extending their 22 month price freeze until April 2015.

Ecotricity founder Dale Vince says;

“The energy industry is, slowly, changing for the better – switching is getting quicker and more people are changing suppliers looking not just for better prices, but also for better service. These latest figures demonstrate that, despite the mass migration away from the Big Six, which is itself often due to poor customer service – the Big Six are getting worse.

“We know that customer service is a key driver of switching; we publish this league table each year because Ofgem won’t do it, for some reason. The online switching sites, which Ofgem regulates, also refuse to give prominence to customer service, focusing solely on price. Both could do better, and people need to know if they are jumping out of the frying pan into the fire – when it comes to leaving their old supplier for poor service.

“Ecotricity has had the lowest number of industry complaints for five years running and we also topped the 2014 Which? energy customer satisfaction survey – we do that by treating people how we would want to be treated, by answering the phone quickly, resolving complaints as they arise, and using a customer service team based here in Gloucestershire who answer the phone themselves, with no automated call waiting. These are basic things that so much of the industry just gets plain wrong.”

While Ecotricity, along with First Utility and SSE, have now cut switching times to 17 days (including a 14 day cooling off period), the rest of the industry has yet to do the same and still take up to 35 days to switch customers – they have until the end of the year to cut switch times according to Ofgem’s new regulations.

Make the simple switch to Ecotricity (and celebrate with a £50 John Lewis voucher too!)

If you want to switch energy supplier and enjoy competitive fixed prices as well as top customer satisfaction, it couldn’t be easier to switch to Ecotricity and literally takes less than five minutes.

To help you celebrate the switch to green energy this Christmas, they will also give you a £50 voucher to spend at John Lewis, if you switch through Lets Get Energized.

Switch online at: www.ecotricity.co.uk/letsgetenergized or call Ecotricity free on 08000 302 302*.

*If you sign up by phone make sure you quote ‘Lets Get Energized’ to get your £50 John Lewis voucher…. Enjoy!



14
NOV

Lets Get Energized says:
Get a £50 John Lewis voucher when you switch to 100% green electricity with Ecotricity


Category: Competitions & Giveaways, Green Electricity & Gas
Tags:


lets_get_energized_694_242

If you do 1 thing today…

Switching to a green energy supplier is one of the simplest things that anyone can do to invest in renewable energy to be part of transforming the UK’s energy landscape for local, natural, sustainable energy – whether you are a homeowner or tenant, have a family or share a student flat!

At Lets Get Energized we are passionate about renewables and sustainable living which is why we recommend the UK’s only two 100% green electricity suppliers – Good Energy and Ecotricity.

We want to show you just how easy it is to switch and how good it will make you feel, which is why all our team use green electricity ourselves at home! Some of us have been supporting green energy for years and others have signed up recently after being inspired by working with us.

Say ‘frack off’ to bad energy!

Ecotricity take the money their customers spend on their electricity and gas bills and turn it into new sources of Green Energy. When they talk about green energy they mean 100% Green Electricity made from the wind and the sun, and ‘Green Gas’ – that comes with a ‘Frack Free’ guarantee.

People are really beginning to turn against the Big Six energy companies, to question where their energy comes from. The reaction to fracking plans in Balcombe is evidence of that, and at Ecotricity they have ensured that none of their gas will come from fracking, and their electricity is always 100% Green. And they don’t just supply green energy, they make it themselves with their rapidly growing fleet of renewable energy parks.

Ecotricity’s Price Promise

As the Big Six Energy companies continue to increase prices by as much as 10%, Ecotricity have also frozen their prices until next year.

And they have a Price Promise too – that they will always be cheaper than the standard Big Six electricity tariff in your region and the standard gas price from British Gas wherever you live.

As a not-for-dividend company, with no shareholders or investors to keep happy, Ecotricity are free to dedicate their money to their mission – changing the way energy is made and used in Britain.

Switching energy supplier is one of the easiest and single biggest things you can do to make a change…

Switch to Ecotricity and get a £50 John Lewis voucher

As if switching to a green energy supplier was not rewarding enough in itself, we are very pleased to announce that Ecotricity have just updated their sign-up offer so that you can celebrate switching to them by treating yourself to a shopping spree at John Lewis with a £50 voucher. And unlike most organisations that take a referral fee for sign-ups – we are giving the whole offer directly to YOU!

It couldn’t be easier to switch to Ecotricity and literally takes less than five minutes.

Switch online at: www.ecotricity.co.uk/letsgetenergized or call Ecotricity free on 08000 302 302.

When you sign up make sure you quote ‘Lets Get Energized’ to get your £50 John Lewis voucher…. Enjoy!



27
OCT

Erik Blakeley says:
Climate Change Deniers


Category: Climate Change, Energy Efficiency, Fuel Poverty & Security, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Wind Power
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Climate Change Deniers

So right wingers are calling for us to ditch the Climate Change Act entirely and to stop making progress on decarbonisation unless it is matched by other countries. Sounds good? Sounds reasonable? Well No and No in my opinion.

It’s easy to say let’s not bother, let’s just go for the cheapest quickest option and to hell with the longer term consequences but sticking our heads in the sand won’t make those consequences go away. All these arguments hinge on what is likely to happen regarding Climate Change. We are all sceptical about individual scientific results after so many false scare stories about food or vaccinations etc etc but there is something different about the work of the IPCC. It doesn’t just look at one set of data from one scientist it has been looking at thousands of sets of data from huge numbers of scientists on all sides of the debate and has been returning to the data at regular intervals to incorporate new findings. This iterative process means that it rules out the occasional rogue set of results or biased experimentation. We can rely on the trends that the IPCC reports regarding the likely outcomes.

What the IPCC is saying is that scientists are more and more certain that the effects of Climate Change are real, dangerous and being initiated by human actions that we are in a position to modify and that we should be doing so. Climate Change deniers are on a par with believers in a flat Earth. They just refuse to accept anything that isn’t immediately obvious from their exceptionally limited vantage point or that upsets their preconceived assumptions. They grasp desperately at any individual piece of work that casts the tiniest doubt on the consensus opinion like the measurements that show that the recorded temperature figures over the last 15 years or so haven’t risen appreciably. They ignore all the other data such as the diminishing ice levels in the polar regions, the increasing occurrence of severe or extreme weather conditions, the changing pattern of the jet stream or the changing behaviour of flora and fauna in response to the changes in the timings of season changes. They ignore any logical explanation of their pet data that might still be compatible with the consensus view such as the suggestion that the oceans are acting as more of a buffer to temperature rise than we expected which, whilst it buys us some time to make the changes we need, does not mean that Climate Change and global warming do not exist.

The right wing economists suggesting that we do away with the Climate Change Act are like people who would rather burn all the furniture in their house than go out and chop some firewood in the yard. It’s certainly easier in the short term but doesn’t make much sense when you want to be able to sit down or go to bed in the future or need to pay for replacements for all the stuff you have ruined.

Is it reasonable to say that we shouldn’t do anything until we can get everyone else to agree? I think not for two main reasons. Firstly it is a false claim by the Climate Change deniers that the likes of India, China and the US are doing nothing. They are making significant efforts with renewable energy and new technologies and we actually need to try harder to keep up if we are to remain a country that makes much of its wealth by technical innovation. Secondly it is true China and India are also increasing their use of non-sustainable technologies but only because their per capita wealth and consumption is so much less than ours and they would like a richer and more affluent population. We cannot reasonably say that we will not lead the way on sustainable technologies unless we first get our per capita carbon footprint down to the level of India or China’s which I would suggest we need to do by advancing sustainable tech not by making ourselves poor.

The other thing that is being said is that we need to ditch the Act and reject renewable`s because “The lights might go out!” Well firstly I would argue that it is the anti-renewable campaigns that are stopping us building the scale and quantity of renewable capacity that is the problem here and a quick temporary fix through some dash for gas is not the answer. Secondly there is this unwritten assumption that the lights going out is the end of the world. If there were to be some limited phased outages during the 8pm winter peaks of demand during a couple of winters over the next few years would this really matter so much that we need to tear up our plans for long term improvements in favour of short term measures that will push us ever closer to real catastrophe? So you miss your favourate soap on broadcast TV and have to go to bed early. Hospitals and other vital services now have much better stand by generation due in part to the green incentives favouring CHP plants and old people’s homes are better insulated than they were due to the ECO schemes so a couple of hours without power won’t see the temperature drop excessively and you can always watch the program on your computer tomorrow. It is only the politicians who have made this an election losing issue who might suffer particularly if this were to happen. Lastly what are they suggesting doing that could come on line before these suggested outages in 2016-2020? About all we could do is build a few OCGT power plants of the sort that the anti-renewable lobby say are undoing any good that wind turbines do do because of the intermittency of wind. If we want to do something now we should be pushing ahead with the energy saving side of the “green crap” to keep demand down to the levels we can reach and keep building the sustainable low carbon capacity that we will need in the next decade as we reach the 2020 targets and progress beyond them toward true sustainability.

A relevant and interesting article can be found here: http://www.scoop.it/t/climate-change-science-risk-economics-sustainability


2Comments | Post your own comment

  • Erik Blakeley comments:
    "Anna has a point but unfortunately the news today is full of further calls by Owen Paterson to ditch the Climate Change Act because the National Grid is mildy concerned that there may be power cuts this winter. Ironically the final straws have been the ongoing problems with several of the nuclear power stations and the fire at Didcot gas powered station. Its hard to see what the logic is as no large scale centralized plant can be built between now and Jan 15 unless it is already under construction. There might be some fossil fuel capacity being underused but using it isn’t illegal it just means buying out a larger proportion of the ROCs so there is no need to scrap the Climate Change Act to get a short term fix like that. There might be time to build a bit more dispersed capacity which gives us a choice of fast tracking some solar and wind or building a few inefficient Open Cycle Gas units or internal combustion gas units both of which would be very polluting, expensive to run and would in all likelihood commit us to widespread fracking if we intend to use them as anything but a few months stopgap. There are people who are only interested in the easiest way to make more money. To some degree we all feel that way and that is why the cliche “Its the Economy Stupid” entered common usage. Short term the cheapest way of dealing with the problems we face are probably the dirtiest. This is why the question of climate change does matter. It is the reason why it is worth paying more for rapid decarbonisation now because it will save us much higher costs and loads of suffering in the future. The big tobacco firms spent ages casting doubt on the links between smoking and cancer and telling young smokers why give up something you enjoy now just because there might be a risk many years in the future and we cannot even be certain that there is a risk. They manipulated and bent the science until it was no sort of truth all in the name of profits. Climate Change deniers are doing the same thing now and they have the added advantage that many of the people with power and influence probably won’t live to see the worst results of climate change. "
    October 28, 2014 a 9:19 am

  • Anna Celeste comments:
    "In a way I personally feel that it almost doesn’t matter whether people believe in climate change or not, or disagree about whether it is a natural phenomena or man-made or a bit of both – what matters is that we should all have the common sense to realise either way, we simply can not go on exhausting our planet of its natural resources like we are currently doing, there will be nothing left very soon, and we have to work in balance with nature which means harnessing energy sustainably i.e., from renewable energy sources – IF we cherish the earth, its animals, our people and the future of our own children and family that is. I think that is what matters and that it is worth fighting for : ) "
    October 27, 2014 a 2:30 pm


09
OCT

Guest Energizer says:
Mind the Gap: How the London Underground Will Help Heat Houses


Category: Energy Efficiency, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Renewable Heat Energy
Tags: , , , , ,


New and innovative ways of saving energy are constantly being thought up as we attempt to reduce our carbon footprints and live more eco-friendly lifestyles. Solar power and wind power are becoming more prevalent, but some more unusual ways to generate power are making headlines. One of these is the use of waste heat from the London Underground to heat homes.

A New Way to Harvest Heat

The project was announced in 2013 by Islington Council (here), which joined forces with the mayor of London, Transport for London and UK Power Networks. The plan is for heat to be captured from a ventilation shaft on the Northern Line, as well as a substation that is run by UK Power Networks, which will then be used to heat buildings in the area.

The senior advisor to the mayor of London, Matthew Pencharz, said that it was important to do everything possible to support energy that is sourced locally to reduce carbon emissions and bills. It is also hoped that this kind of project will create more jobs in the sector.

The council has applied for £1 million in grant funding from the European Commission, and it will also provide funding itself. It is the first such project in Europe, and it is hoped that it will allow 500 more homes be connected to the heat network in Islington.

A New Focus on Innovative Energy

This scheme is one of the most innovative energy producing schemes announced so far, and it will help many households to save energy and reduce CO2 emissions by using energy that would otherwise be wasted.

But there are many other schemes that are also being introduced that are changing the way we produce and use energy. One of these is the Pavegen system, which is a way of creating energy from paving slabs as people walk over them. This was displayed during the London Olympics, and although it will probably not go mainstream in the near future, it shows what is possible.
Other innovations are on a smaller scale, like the Nest Learning Thermostat. This new smart thermostat, which is now being installed for free by npower.com (here) on its Intelligent Fix tariff, programmes itself, turns itself down when no one is home, adapts to your lifestyle and can be controlled by a smartphone.

Of course, there are other standard things you can do in your home, such as installing insulation, double-glazing windows and solar panels, or simply being more careful about turning devices off when you leave the room.

Look Out for More Innovative Ways to Save Energy

The London Underground project shows the way forward for innovative ways to capture energy and reduce wastage. Over time, we are likely to see an increasing number of such schemes arise as we look for ways to reduce waste. However, don’t forget that you can also do your bit to reduce energy in the home through taking simple steps like installing insulation or making use of new technology like smart thermostats. And by making small steps, we can all collectively help to make a huge difference.

This is a post by Guest Energizer Emily Whittaker who has a great enthusiasm for energy research. With an eye for creative solutions and emerging technology, she loves blogging about the ideas and innovations for a more efficient energy future.



08
OCT

Erik Blakeley says:
How Many Is Enough?


Category: Energy Efficiency, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Living, Wind Power
Tags: , , ,


How Many Is Enough?

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph – http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/energy/renewableenergy/11125908/Thousand-more-wind-turbines-than-UK-needs.html.

And here is a response:

Where do you start? It is total nonsense!

What is worse is some of the total C**P in the comments after the article.

The first point is that, on current planning application process times, all they are saying is that wind power might reach its share of the 2020 target in time although this actually seems unlikely as some applications take as much as 10 years to reach fruition. I suspect that other forms of renewables will be way behind target given the slower than expected technological development in things like wave power and the persistently high LCOE figures for offshore renewables and nuclear (far higher than the relatively low cost of onshore wind) which are likely to make it difficult to have such technologies take up their projected share of the burden without causing unsustainable price rises for the consumer.

Secondly, and I keep stressing this and suggest that everyone else does so too, 2020 is not the end of the process! David Cameron himself recently stressed the importance of the 2050 target for 80% decarbonisation which is the only one that actually makes a difference when we consider the risks of run away climate change because the 2020 target of 15%, if it is achieved and then no more progress is made, will merely mildly delay the point at which we reach a significant tipping point and the driving force of climate change stops being human activity directly and starts being more related to factors such as the lack of albedo effect once the ice caps have gone or the mass evolution of methane from the oceans and melting tundra.

If, and it is still a big if, we can build a bit more onshore wind than the 2020 targets suggest now it is a good thing in that it helps us have a better chance of making the 2050 target. In the comments following the article we get the same old rubbish about wind farms being too intermittent, they don’t save any carbon emissions because fossil fuel capacity is on spinning reserve, its all about subsidies for greedy land owners and developers. All of these are just lies. The variation in demand is far greater than the variation in wind power so the need for spinning reserves is going to be there regardless of whether we have wind power or not. Much of the reason why peaking and balancing generation (the spinning reserves) is so less efficient than baseload generation is because much of our peaking and balancing currently comes from low efficiency open cycle gas turbines (OCGT`s). This need not be the case in the future. Pumped hydro and electrochemical storage technologies both have the response characteristics to perform peaking and balancing. Efficient new generation combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) plant is also much quicker to react than the older CCGT and they could be run more and more on Anaerobic Digester gas and hydrogen derived from surplus wind or other renewables.

We need to get rid of the out of date OCGT technology not the wind turbines! Even with the old OCGTs causing minor issues the effect of renewables in general and wind in particular is now proven in the National Grid and DECC figures that show reductions in coal consumption and consequent CO2 reductions clearly linked to renewable generation so the positive effect of renewables isn’t even a theoretical effect in the future, it is already making a significant contribution despite the relatively low share of overall capacity – lesson learned build more of what is working not less!

I heard an article on the radio recently that was very interesting. I have thought for some time that we are in the same position regarding climate change and renewable energy that we were in regarding lung cancer and smoking in the 1970s and 80s in that people with scientific knowledge (I won’t call them scientists because their lack of respect for scientific truth debars them from that title in my opinion) are being employed by those with huge financial interests in stopping the development of renewables to generate spurious but believable “evidence” against renewables. The radio piece I heard actually suggested that not only were the big fossil fuel firms using the same tactics as the tobacco firms they were actually employing the same people!


2Comments | Post your own comment

  • Erik Blakeley comments:
    "The new EU targets that the Govt has agreed may or may not be good news as far as reaching the ultimate targets of full decarbonisation but they certainly require a near doubling of the renewable energy contribution between 2020 and 2030. Given that the amount of renewables we will have by 2020 will have been put in place over several decades this will mean a scaling up of the rate of delivery of renewables. This means that any suggestions that we have enough are just stupid. "
    October 24, 2014 a 12:19 pm

  • vince adams comments:
    "Well said now lets move on and focus on how to maintain, strengthen and ultimately turn our energy supply into 80% renewable by 2030
    Cancel Hinkley Nuclear Power and make the possible Possible "

    October 8, 2014 a 6:06 pm


01
SEP

Lets Get Energized says:
Energize your day with It’s All Good Radio Show & Dorset Energized


Category: Climate Change, Energy Efficiency, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Renewable Energy Film/Video, Sustainable Living
Tags: ,


It’s all going on this week here at Dorset Energized, and its all good!!!

Dorset Energized are very excited to be working with the inspiring duo Debbie Hyde and David Durant who have created their own internet radio show entitled It’s All Good as co-founders of Media for Good, which is a non-profit partnership with the aim of harnessing the power of media to effect change towards a more sustainable economy and protection of the Earth’s resources.

Dorset Energized’s Vince Adams first met Debbie at Ecotricity’s Green Britain meeting in March 2014 in Brighton, and since then our team have been in talks with Debbie and David about how we can work together to help people get energized and create a renewable energy future…

It’s All Good Radio Podcasts

You can tune in to stories, news and interviews with people like you – creating a bright clean energy future, every week on the It’s All Good radio show podcasts on Renewable Energy which will also feature contributions from the Dorset Energized Team including our bloggers Vince Adams and Keith Wheaton-Green.

Debbie has also set herself a challenge to write a blog post every single day this September so make sure you check them out at www.itsallgoodradioshow.com

As Debbie says on her latest blog post Communicating a positive vision of a 100% clean energy future – we all have power and we all have choices. Every one of us has the opportunity to choose today to work towards a positive vision of a 100% clean energy future, for as William Ward says “If you can imagine it, you can create it. If you can dream it, you can become it.”

She calls upon fellow broadcasters, advertisers, writers, bloggers, designers, photographers, film makers, actors, artists, musicians and singers – as “together we need to bring sustainable living to life and make it a natural part of our culture which is relevant and fun for all of us.”

We are right here with you Debbie and very much looking forward to sharing your shows…

Throughout September you’ll enjoy a mix of stories, news and interviews from people all around the world who are making the switch to renewable energy. Get involved and share your stories too. Just click onto www.itsallgoodradioshow.com plus check out the previous podcasts on Renewable Energy at http://www.mixcloud.com/debbiehyde88

Do YOU support a 100% Clean Energy Future?
Choose a way YOU can take action:

Here are some great actions Debbie also shared on her latest blog post we wanted to make sure you didn’t miss:

It’s All Good Radio Show is an internet radio show produced and presented by Debbie Hyde which is broadcast at 9pm GMT on http://www.brooklandsradio.co.uk.



21
AUG

Keith Wheaton-Green says:
Can electric cars and vans solve the renewable energy storage problem?


Category: Electric Transport, Energy Efficiency, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Living
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Can electric cars and vans solve the renewable energy storage problem?

The four main electrical power distribution networks have just announced a two year project to test the viability of using the batteries of electric vehicle fleets (when parked up and connected to the grid for a long trickle charge) to balance the grid.

http://www.futuretransportsystems.co.uk/projects/vehicle-to-grid-desk-study-1.aspx

The two stage project will first test the impact on battery life and then produce a prototype vehicle equipped with validated processes and hardware.

It’s easy (certainly for me) to imagine a future when the majority of vehicles are electric and your electrical supply company buys electricity from you from your car battery when the software within the car tells the grid it has power to spare. Your car would always be connected for charging and exporting (grid balancing) when parked up at home and the grid would only draw back power during times of peak demand when your battery was fully charged. I haven’t done the maths but it could be that the massive storage capacity available will far exceed that needed to balance the grid to cope with intermittent renewables such as wind and PV.



14
AUG

Keith Wheaton-Green says:
There really is a Renewable Energy Revolution Going On!


Category: Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Water Power, Wind Power
Tags: , , , ,


There really is a Renewable Energy Revolution Going On!

I’ve just read about the record breaking wind energy records for a day in August 2014. 5.0 GW of electricity supplying 17% of the UK demand on a Sunday night. At the same time hydro was delivering 2.0% and biomass 2.5%. So we had 21.0% of electricity being delivered by renewable`s.

However, it appears that these figures from the trade organisation Renewables UK and other data from DECC don’t include anything other than the half hourly metered generation ie the big MegaWatt sized wind and solar farms, big Scottish high head hydro plant and old coal fired power stations converted to burn wood pellet or chip. What about all the Solar PhotoVoltaics on house and industrial estate roofs or the small 20 kW wind turbines on farms or the small hydro plant at old mill sites? These don’t appear to be captured in the data because up to the minute (well half hour) generation data is not available. They are only metered on a quarterly basis. Luckily you can get an idea of what is happening with these small kW sized installations from the ofgem Feed In Tariff`s statistical reports – Click Here and go to FIT installations statistical report – or direct to the report: Here

My calculations indicate an additional 1% of UK demand over the course of a year. Less than I was hoping for but growing quickly all the time. Especially Solar PV, which is apparently found on 1 in every 32 houses in the south west. I know from my own generation from 4 kW of PV and the generation from the South Somerset District Council PV portfolio that 2014 has been a bumper year.


1Comments | Post your own comment


15
JUL

Keith Wheaton-Green says:
Discounted electric bills if you live near a Wind Farm


Category: Energy Deals & Offers, Fuel Poverty & Security, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Wind Power
Tags: , , ,


Discounted electric bills if you live near a Wind Farm

Already happening in Scotland: http://www.nextgenmedia.co.uk/news/1313-new-onshore-wind-farm-generates-discounted-bills-for-local-residents

This is probably the best use of the community benefit fund. My suggestion would be 80% discount for those living within 4 km and 50% discount for those living within the next band up to 8 km. I’d be interested to see how much this would cost in the case of the three proposed wind projects in Dorset. If this is of interest to the companies involved, we could do the calculations for them based on number of households and average Dorset electricity consumption. I suspect there would still be a lot of money left over in the community fund.



08
JUL

Erik Blakeley says:
Fracking or Wind Turbines


Category: Fracking, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Wind Power
Tags: , , ,


Fracking or wind turbines?

Which would you choose?

I oppose fracking. My main reason for doing so is that I fear that fracking is being used as the means to put off developing our plentiful and clean renewable potential simply because it makes it easier for the Chancellor to generate a boom and bust economic recovery that will get him re-elected next year and perhaps in another 5 years time at the expense of a sustainable recovery and meaningful reductions in green house gas emissions. This is enough to make me oppose fracking. However there are lots of other reasons suggested for opposing fracking. Lots of frightening stories are out there on the internet. The problem is how to assess which risks are significant enough to be worth considering which is even harder than sorting the facts from the falsehoods. As a campaigner for renewables and therefore against fracking it is tempting to point out that some of the chemicals used in fracking in America are carcinogens and can have other toxic effects and fracking has been accused of causing earthquakes or of releasing natural gas into water supplies to the extent that gas escaping from domestic taps can be lit with a cigarette lighter. However it is not clear how comparable the fracking process in Britain would be to that use in America and, cynic though I am, I do still suspect that any use of the technique would be better regulated here than in the cowboy environment of the fracking industry of America. So it is hard to tell just how bad fracking would be for its potential neighbours in Britain. If you want to see the worst case scenario for fracking see this site: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/dec/14/fracking-hell-live-next-shale-gas-well-texas-us

Perhaps a better approach is to ask ourselves how is it likely to compare with the alternatives? We do need to do something. Our energy infrastructure is wearing out and will not meet the needs of the 21st Century. If we ignore the ethical element we might get away with being NIMBYs and expect others to put up with things that we want the benefits from but don’t want to see near us but we cannot be BANANAs (Build Absolutely Nothing Anywhere Near Anybody). The obvious alternative is wind turbines. Scare stories abound about noise and flicker and the amounts of concrete used in their foundation and of course there is the subjective aesthetic question of visual amenity. Now I have done much more research into the realities of the issues relating to wind turbines than I have into fracking and my conclusion is that every issue except the subjective question of visual impact is either grossly over stated by the antis or even absolutely untrue and that, when you are talking about small wind farms of less than ten turbines sited 500m or more from the nearest houses the visual impact is very much dependent on how much of a Victor Meldrew you let yourself become by staring at the turbines and winding yourself up into a froth about them. I truly believe that you have every reason to ignore them because they won’t do you any harm. It would be unfair of me therefore to suggest that you believe all the very worst stories about fracking and reject all the ones about wind turbines even though I believe that there is much more truth behind the fracking stories than the turbine myths (can you detect my bias there??!).

So what can we say for certain. Developing a fracking field involved months of heavy industrial work during which a great deal of noise and dust is created and millions of gallons of fracturing fluid will need to be tankered in or made up on site using local water resources and more concentrated chemicals which may or may not be a significant risk to you but certainly would not be something you would like to see spilled into your local stream if one of the many tankers was to have a crash. Most of the fracking fluid will come back to the surface via the bore hole and will need to be stored onsite until it can be tankered out again for safe disposal or reprocessing/recycling at another well. Part of the job of the fluid is to corrosively attack the rock the stop the cracks closing up again. This means that the fluid will return to the surface loaded with dissolved minerals. Now this might well not be the sort of thing you would bottle and sell as a health tonic as it is likely to include heavy metals in much the same way as the acid mine water does that has sterilized many a stream in Yorkshire or Wales. With the best will in the world I do believe that losses from storage lagoons and tanks will occur and sure, the firms will be fined by the Environment Agency etc, but only after the event when your environment is polluted.

Once the well heads are in place there will probably still need to be storage tanks on site and there may well be the requirement for periodic refracturing when the whole fluid insertion and pressurisation process will need to be repeated.

In comparison the building of a wind farm of 6 turbines is a minor inconvenience. Each turbine requires a concrete foundation equivalent to about 6 modern family homes and once they are in place the structure of the turbine itself can be erected in a single day especially if road links to the site are reasonable and it can be brought in largely prefabricated. Power electronics for the farm about the size of a single lorry container gather the electricity from the individual turbines and feed it into underground cables that connect into the 11kV mains at the sort of transformer station that you will already have in your village or community. Thereafter they run extremely quietly and require relatively low levels of maintenance for years of clean electricity generation.

In conclusion my main objection to fracking is because of the implications for the long term energy policies of our country but I am also in no doubt whatsoever, 100% certain etc etc that I would choose a wind farm in my back yard over a fracking site any day of the year but will I get the chance to choose? Of course I won’t. As long as the government thinks it can make a quick buck to boost GDP and it calculates that the anti-wind turbine campaigners are active in more marginal rural constituencies than the anti-fracking campaigners are they will push ahead with fracking in just the same way as 12 new nuclear power plants will be pushed through because it is a flaw in the democratic system that the unreasonable objections of 100 constituencies to wind turbines outvote the reasonable objections of 12 constituencies to nuclear expansion.

Localism is all very well but is must go hand in hand with a sense of the bigger picture. We can all share in the benefits of dispersed generation by renewables but we must all accept a little of something in our back yard unless we want to take our chances in the fracking and nuclear lotteries and condemn our grandchildren to suffer the longer term consequences.


1Comments | Post your own comment

  • Keith Wheaton-Green comments:
    "I was going to suggest that you also put your blog on the DART websie but on investigation discover that they have no blog section! Presumably they don’t want to encourage discussion but simply appear as the font of all knowledge. "
    July 10, 2014 a 2:04 pm


27
JUN

Jacob Windsor says:
Ecotricity finish top of the Which? Customer survey again


Category: Green Electricity & Gas
Tags: , , ,


Ecotricity #1 in the customer survey rankings

We are thrilled that green energy suppliers Ecotricity has returned to number one in the rankings with the fewest customer complaints in the energy industry despite experiencing unprecedented growth in the first quarter of 2014.

Consumer champion Which? has released figures this June which show the Big Six energy companies received a total of 1.7 million customer complaints in the first quarter of 2014, the highest number received in one single quarter since records began in 2012.

You can view the  customer complaints league table for all energy companies, including the smaller independent suppliers that now receive more than half of all customer switches here.

The best performing Big Six energy company is Scottish Power with 13.57 complaints per 100 customers, while Ecotricity has just 1.93 complaints per 1000 customers.

Massive upheavals in the sector appear to be effecting customer service across the industry, with both Big Six energy companies and some independents struggling with customer service standards.

Many smaller energy companies, like Ecotricity, have experienced unprecedented growth over the past three to six months.

In our case, the number of customers we supply grew 26% in just the first three months of 2014 and shows no sign of slowing down. And in the past six months we’ve recruited and trained more than 100 new customer service staff – a 91% rise – to keep pace with the workload, to maintain staff-to-customer ratios and prepare for further growth, because excellent customer service is a core part of what we do.

This rate of growth can be expected to bring with it some problems in maintaining customer service levels and this looks to be occurring elsewhere within the industry.

These figures also show that complaints to the Big Six continue to grow despite their relative poor performance on customer service, because they have systemic problems with how they treat customers, while any issues with smaller suppliers should hopefully be a temporary problem.

Ecotricity’s customer numbers had grown by 26% in the three months between January and March this year and by over 40% from 71,000 to 100,000 in the six months to between October 2013 and March 2014.

Make the switch to green energy today

You too can switch to Ecotricity online at www.ecotricity.co.uk/dorset-energized or call us on 08000 302 302 and quote ‘Dorset Energized’ plus you’ll receive a free £60 Naked Wines voucher to celebrate.



26
JUN

Conor MacGuire says:
The Green Deal for Home – Explained


Category: Biomass Energy, Combined Heat & Power, Energy Deals & Offers, Energy Efficiency, Green Deal, Green Electricity & Gas, Heat Pumps, Solar Energy, Sustainable Living
Tags: , ,


Green Deal Plan for Home: Here is the Start to Finish Process

It’s called the Green Deal – a project designed to help you make energy saving improvements at home and also to find the ideal way to make payments for the same. Home improvements for maximum energy conservation generally depend upon the structure of the house. However the main focus of the project should be including solid wall insulation, double glazing, boiler upgrades, and much many other things discussed below.

After many years of talking and planning about the Green Deal, the flagship energy saving scheme designed by the government is finally up and running. The aim of the project is to make every house warmer and much cheaper to run. To achieve this however, people are not required to shell large sums of money upfront. 

The Green Deal project typically comprises of the following stages:

1. Assessment

Assessment involves inspection of your home or office premises by a fully accredited Green Deal Advisors. The respective advisor will perform the following functions:

  • Survey the entire property and come up with EPC (Energy Performance Certificate) in order to ascertain the current energy rating and also to recognize the types of developments which the Green Deal can fund.
  • In case the EPC recognizes any suitable measure fit for attaining Green Deal finance, the Green Deal Assessor will commence a Green Deal Occupancy Assessment and recognize what improvements are going to be cost effective and look out for any scope of cash back or subsidies.
  • Explain in detail the entire payment process
  • Prepare a Green Deal advice report that will outline all your available options
  • Also assist you in selecting a Green Deal Provider
  • Supervise the home improvement installations and sign off as soon as the work is complete.

2. Installation

The Green Deal Advisor will fix up with the Green Deal Provider and appoint a suitable Green Deal Installer for you. The installer will then make the required home improvement jobs – you and the Green Deal Advisor agreed upon. You are required to constantly access the installer to ensure he fulfills all the standards laid down by the Green Deal.

3. Repayment

You are required to pay back the cost of your various home improvement jobs over a period of time by means of electricity bills. Here your electricity supplier is supposed to pass on your payments to the respective Green Deal Provider. It is to be noted that the amount you pay via your electricity bill is not going to be more than you save upon your heating bills. This way you are guaranteed to be in profit from the very first day.

You’ll be required to pay for your home improvement services, but the payment you make will never be considered as your conventional personal loan. Reason – the payment will be attached to your electricity meter and paid back in the form of electricity bill. In case you vacate the property, the charge will be picked up by the new occupant, who will also benefit from the energy-efficient property.

A regular interest will be charged on all payments, but the rate will be fixed. In addition, you will be shown a complete schedule of all the payments before you finally sign up the plan.

Improvements covered by the Green Deal include:

  • Insulation
  • Glazing
  • Heating and hot power
  • Microgeneration

The non-domestic centers would also cover mechanical ventilation, heat recovery measures and lighting.

Incentives to Begin the Green Deal Scheme

Recently, the government launched the Green Deal Cask Back Scheme in an attempt to encourage more homeowners to take up home improvements right in the early days of Green Deal.

According to the scheme, the most eligible candidates will receive cash back guarantee as soon as they get their measures installed. The highest rates will be allotted to the earliest applicants.

The ECO (Energy Company Obligation)

The ECO for the large six energy suppliers comprises of three parts, including:

1. Affordable Warm Obligation

This will provide heating and hot water saving measures, glazing, micro generation technology and insulation to vulnerable and low-income households. There are however complex eligibility criteria for this scheme.

2. Carbon Saving Obligation

CSO is a means to provide funding in order to insulate solid-walled premises including those with tough to treat cavity walls.

3. Carbon Saving Communities Obligation

This will provide glazing and insulation measures to all people comprising of bottom 15% of the most deprived areas in UK.



22
MAY

Guest Energizer says:
How to destabilise the Green Energy Market?


Category: Green Deal, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Uncategorized
Tags: , , , ,


How to destabilise the Green Energy Market?

Sent to us by Sally Cooke. This highly pertinent article might be of interest for Dorset Energized readers.

Written by Dr Philip Webber, a former research physicist and now visiting professor at the University of Leeds working to develop and finance city scale low carbon programmes, his opinion on the government’s recent track record on energy efficiency is :

“If you were trying to deliberately destabilise a market by misinformed intervention it would be hard to beat the last year of home energy efficiency finance.”

The article is available on the Scientists for Global Responsibility Website:

http://www.sgr.org.uk/resources/decc-creates-more-chaos-energy-efficiency-sector



02
MAY

Vince Adams says:
Community Energy in practice


Category: Community Energy, Green Electricity & Gas, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy
Tags: , , ,


I recently spent time with the Bristol Power team who have so many good things going for them. Their latest project is putting solar onto 5,000 local homes in Bristol and they have had extensive talks with Ovo Energy to create special community tariffs for the power generated.

This will mean the very best returns for ordinary hard-pressed householders eager to reduce their energy bills.

For more info take a look at www.ovoenergy.com

And an interesting related news story – here



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