Archive for July, 2015


17
JUL

Vince Adams says:
Ovo the name for change


Category: Community Energy, Uncategorized
Tags:


There is much talk about Community Energy and the opportunities that will open up this way of bringing local communities together with energy creation.

The results can be startling, as an example Balcombe in Sussex. This quiet sleepy village became a conflict zone when locals and activists decided to fight test drills being made for Fracking. No one nationally really wants anything to do with fracking but Balcombe stood firm.

After days of blockade, arrests of good people and true the drillers finally went away and guess what, out of the battle came a new energy, Community Energy.

The local people formed into a group to develop their own energy schemes and almost overnight had their first project, fully funded, installed and creating clean energy and reasonable returns for the investors.

Its this sort of lead that will ultimately inspite people everywhere to create their own schemes. I Chair ESVIPS.com and we have installed our first solar project at Springhead Trust, Fontmell Magna and hope to have others up and running later this year.

Getting a fair price for the energy being created is important and I wanted to share a link with you to Ovo an innovative renewable energy supplier.

Its: http://www.ovoenergy.com/energy-plans/communities/

Ovo are the first Company to offer to offer the local people near a project the chance to but their own local energy at really advantageous prices far below the market norms.

The result will be that community energy can use a majority of its generation to the advantage of the local people bringing down their overall energy costs and giving them a real stake in whats happening in their own locality.

Go to the site and see what you think.



17
JUL

Vince Adams says:
Save Energy Tips and Save £££’s


Category: Energy Efficiency, Uncategorized
Tags:


David Bedford has created this amazing guide and has offered to share it with our subscribers.

Theres a huge range of energy saving tips and I hope you find it helpful

http://underfloorheatingexpert.com/save-energy/

 

 



13
JUL

Vince Adams says:
Visit to local Solar Farm


Category: Solar Energy, Uncategorized
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Lightsource Takes Local Residents on Guided Tour of Dorset Solar Farm as Part of Nationwide Solar Independence Day

 

Lightsource Renewable Energy invited visitors for a very special behind-the-scenes look at look at Manor Farm solar farm, in Dorset, as part of the Solar Independence Day celebrations.

 

Visitors of all ages and from all walks of life – from school children and wildlife groups to farmers and local politicians – were given guided tours of the park to see first-hand the benefits of solar energy.

 

Once a solar farm is installed, members of the public rarely get a chance to step foot inside the gates, but the event gave people a chance to get a better understanding of how a solar farm works, the impact on the land and improvements to biodiversity that can be made.

Installed in just six weeks, the 25-acre solar farm solar farm is now capable of providing locally-sourced, renewable energy to 1,400 homes – roughly a third of the homes found in nearby Gillingham.

Lightsource has put into action a planting and landscape plan at Manor Farm, which provides numerous benefits to local biodiversity. The planting of new trees and shrubs around the site provides foraging habitats for local wildlife, while the new wild-flower meadow mix will offer a favourable environment to flying insects including bees, butterflies and dragonflies. Since its installation, the landowner has also reported an increase in the numbers of hares, raptors and hawks – a strong sign that wildlife is flourishing on site.

Manor Farm was one of many solar farms, homes and commercial installations to open up to the public as part of Solar Independence Day, which also gave the public an insight into why “energy independence” in the UK is so important. Solar power can play a vital role in achieving this goal by reducing the UK dependence on importing polluting fossil fuels, in favour of generating clean “home-grown” energy.

Nick Boyle, CEO at Lightsource, said: “We relish opportunities to give the public a greater insight into what solar energy is all about. On top of providing a source of clean, renewable energy, solar installations offer far reaching benefits for local communities with improvements to local biodiversity and by supporting agricultural businesses. The Manor Farm is a great example of the positive effects a solar farm can have on an area. ”

Lightsource_Manor Farm-86


1Comments | Post your own comment

  • Vince Adams comments:
    "Vince Adams of Letsgetenergized.co.uk and esvips.com comments: As the founder of letsgetenergized a portal that supports renewable energy I was fascinated by my visit.The remoteness of the site gave it a Cathedral like quiet only broken by the sound of distant traffic Not a sound was heard from the panels themselves with sheep grazing happily all around us the visit was rather special.To think that our future energy needs can come from Solar Farms rather than Power station belching out smoke and carbon 24 hours a day is remarkable. The small footprint that the site has with a small concreted area for the inverters to sit on and everything else instantly removable is amazing. Thanks to Lightsource and Liza for opening the site my only regret was missing the barbecue. "
    July 13, 2015 a 6:56 pm


13
JUL

Keith Wheaton-Green says:
Wind Turbines in Dorset? Planning Committee says NO


Category: Community Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Uncategorized, Wind Power
Tags: , , ,


Wind Turbines in Dorset? Planning Committee says NO

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I recently attended a wind turbine planning determination in a crowded village hall when the planning committee (well 6 of the 11 members attended) decided the fate of an application for 4 large wind turbines. We all listened to officers of the council and AONB explain the landscape and heritage sensitivities (the turbines would be seen in the setting of listed buildings and the beautiful Dorset landscape) followed by numerous speakers against and for the application.

Those opposed to the application made the point that our landscape must be preserved, that the turbines would be seen from village houses and gardens and even that wind turbines damage people’s health. The CPRE claimed that renewable energy targets in Dorset had been exceeded so no new installations were needed. Each speaker received rapturous applause.

I have witnessed a few campaigns to oppose wind turbine applications in Somerset and Dorset. There is usually assistance from outside organisations. Meetings, leaflets and doorstep petitions are arranged. The purpose – of course – is to raise anxiety levels. Misinformation is spread such as; bird and bat populations are put at risk; infra sound prevents people sleeping and gives them headaches; house prices will fall and tourists will stay away. Wind turbines are inefficient and generate hardly anything. Sometimes photographs that exaggerate the scale are published.

In reality, the choice to approve or not – as the officers and members present acknowledged –is justified on the basis of a subjective view of landscape and visual aesthetics.

About seven of us spoke up in favour of the application. It was explained that climate change is an issue that needs to be dealt with so urgently we need to move to 100% of our electricity from renewables ASAP, that wind turbines are the cheapest technology but that there are very sites suitable for their installation in Dorset.

When I spoke, looking out onto the big audience of grey haired baby boomers while younger people were at work, I realised just where the divide in opinion lay. The majority of the audience – many retired to timeless Hardy’s Dorset – would not sacrifice their views from around the village to give the younger generation a better future. Yet just think what the generation before the baby boomers sacrificed in the 30s, 40s and 50s!

Anyone wanting to live in Hardy’s Dorset should stop using electricity, swap their car for a horse and cart, live in a very small draughty house and campaign to take out pylons and large roads. If we walk backwards into the future, we will suffer because we can’t see where we are going.

I spoke up for farmers. They may be sitting on land and property worth millions with large sums flowing through their business but their disposable income can be modest. They work very long hours as standard and consider themselves guardians of the land (and landscape) which they expect to pass on to their children rather than realize paper wealth.

I was once told by a farmer – only half-jokingly – that I shouldn’t expect him to take my opinions on local matters seriously because my family had not been in Dorset since Saxon times. Despite that comment, farmers are usually quiet, self-effacing, not prone to voicing their opinions and actually can be intimidated.

Wind turbines make sense to farmers because they give resource efficient future financial security. The opposing camp are very ably led by people some of which, have moved into the area to retire. They put high value on the landscape the farming community have created and look after, but look to the past rather than the constant change and planning for the future they may have experienced in their own working lives.

The media are underestimating the connection between peoples voting intentions and their views on climate change. The Green surge is largely due to younger people with a strong sense of injustice against their generation. Baby boomers have had it good with their jetting around the world on holiday, big cars and houses by mortgaging their children’s and grandchildren’s futures (the deficit.) This put the carbon in the atmosphere that puts future generations in jeopardy.



10
JUL

Anna Celeste Watson says:
Explore renewable energy technologies for your home, business or farm


Category: Biomass Energy, Combined Heat & Power, Energy Efficiency, Heat Pumps, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy, Water Power, Wind Power
Tags:


Just wanted to share these great interactive diagrams created by MCS certified renewable energy installers Futurum Renewable Energy Systems who are based here in Dorset but cover much of the UK.

They are a really quick and easy visual way to explore what renewable energy options are possible for your home, business or farm – from Solar, Heat Pumps and Biomass Energy to Water and Wind Power.

futurum-home

futurum-business

futurum-farm

Click on the diagrams to link through to their site to see more, or to explore technologies further go to: http://futurumltd.co.uk/technologies.



07
JUL

Vince Adams says:
Important event in Glastonbury this Friday


Category: Community Energy, Energy News for UK, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized
Tags:


You are invited to the
launch of a new report from the Resilience Centre:

The power to transform the South West

How to meet the region’s energy needs through renewable energy generation

5.30pm, Friday 10th July 2015

Glastonbury Town Hall, Magdalene Street, Glastonbury, Somerset., BA6 9EL

Panel
Molly Scott Cato, Green MEP for SW England
Andrew Clarke, Resilience Centre
Sonya Bedford, Head of Renewable Energy, Stephens Scown Solicitors Tom Hathway, South West Young Greens, University of Plymouth Chaired by Jon Cousins Deputy Mayor, Glastonbury Town Council



01
JUL

Vince Adams says:
M&S grants for Community Energy Projects


Category: Community Energy, Uncategorized
Tags:


We have some great community energy newsenergyshare are partnering with M&S Energy to run their first ever Community Energy Fund, a competition to distribute £400,000 in grants to renewable energy projects that benefit the community.
If you’re a not for profit organisation that wants to use renewable energy to provide community benefits, this is your chance to secure funding! Whether you’re a community energy group, a sports club or simply an organisation that wants to have a positive impact on the environment, we want to hear from you.There are three types of capital funding available to apply for:

  1.     A national funding pot for a project that require a maximum of £40,000.
  2.     A national funding pot for a project that require a maximum of £20,000.
  3.     Regional funding pots for projects that require a maximum of £12,500.

We also have a minimum funding of £15,000 which will be split between the most inspiring and innovative projects.

Applications close on 29th July 2015 so to take part, simply complete the M&S Energy online application.

It’s easier to take part than you might think, so have a look at some projects from energyfund Cornwall, a similar project we ran last year, and see how easy it is.
We look forward to receiving your application.

Good luck!

 

http://us10.campaign-archive1.com/?u=e6e9a90ecb6b91dd5cbe82f4d&id=370cba09f7&e=ca745227ad


1Comments | Post your own comment

  • Vince Adams comments:
    "What an opportunity for small projects created by local group to get involved, for help, support etc visit espies.com "
    July 1, 2015 a 2:41 pm


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